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Scientists Are Hunting for the 'Dark Photon'

11 February 2018 - 12:35pm
Ryan Mandelbaum, Gizmodo
It appears that the Universe is full of dark matteraround six times more of it than there is regular matter. It has obvious visible effects, like the way it bends light from distant galaxies. Despite dedicated searches, no signs of a dark matter particle explaining these effects have turned up.
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U.S. Flu Season Now as Bad as Swine Flu Epidemic

11 February 2018 - 12:35pm
The Guardian
The flu has further tightened its grip on the US This season is now as bad as the swine flu epidemic nine years ago.A government report on Friday shows one of every 13 visits to the doctor last week was for fever, cough and other symptoms of the flu. That ties the highest level seen in the US during swine flu in 2009.
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Disease Definition of Addiction: More Harm Than Good

11 February 2018 - 12:34pm
Marc Lewis, Sci Am
Over the past year and a half, Scientific American has published a number of fine articles arguing that addiction is not a disease, that drugs are not the cause of addiction, and that social and societal factors are fundamental contributors to opioid addiction in general and the overdose crisis in particular.
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How Do Volcanoes Make Lightning?

11 February 2018 - 12:34pm
Ethan Siegel, Forbes
When hot, molten rock pushes its way up through the Earth's crust and exits through to the surface, it often results in a volcanic eruption. These eruptions sometimes occur via slow and steady flows, but often show themselves in huge bursts of activity. When this latter case happens, a large amount of ash, dust, rock, volatile gases, and lava all are expelled in a very short period of time.
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Why South Koreans Live Longer Than Americans

11 February 2018 - 12:34pm
Belluz & Frostenson, Vox
Athletes from South Korea and America will compete for medals at the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang but at least in one way, the South Koreans are already winning.As recently as 1960, most South Koreans couldn't expect to live past 55. Today, they can expect to live longer than Americans for more than 80 years. And this gap is expected to get even wider very soon.
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Scientists Scan 14 Kepler Worlds for 'Technosignatures'

11 February 2018 - 12:32pm
Matt Williams, U-Today
When it comes to looking for life on extra-solar planets, scientists rely on what is known as the low-hanging fruit approach. In lieu of being able to observe these planets directly or up close, they are forced to look for biosignatures substances that indicate that life could exist there. Given that Earth is the only planet (that we know of) that can support life, these include carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and water.
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Major Universities 'At One' with Junk Science

11 February 2018 - 12:31pm
Ruth Kava, ACSH
Major universities (think Harvard, Columbia, Duke, and the University of California), have hopped on the "alternative medicine" bandwagon, establishing centers and programs to supposedly evaluate treatments not based on Western medicine. Not all of the work is done at these institutions their proponents collaborate at other centers for example the Chopra Foundation, based at a resort in California.
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Are Happy Lab Animals Better for Science?

11 February 2018 - 12:30pm
David Grimm, Science News
If they weren't in the windowless basement of a cavernous biomedical research building, the "Aquatic Suites" might sound like a cushy vacation destination. But the zebrafish here at the University of Michigan (UM) still have it pretty good. In a large room full of aquaria, the striped, pinkie-size swimmers flit past fake green plants, white plastic tunnels, and multicolored marbles that may remind them of the bottoms of lakes and streams.
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Prehistoric Rainforest Collapse Changed Evolution Course

11 February 2018 - 12:30pm
Emma Dunne, Conv
Over 750,000 square kilometres of Amazon rainforest have been cleared since 1970 a fifth of the total. As a result, many of the animals that live there are threatened with extinction. But this isn't the first time the Earth has seen its rainforests shrink. Toward the end of the Carboniferous period, around 307m years ago, the planet's environment shifted dramatically, and its vast tropical rainforests vanished.
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Lasers Could Solve the Space Junk Problem

11 February 2018 - 12:29pm
Megan Ray Nichols, RCScience
If you gaze up at the night sky, you expect to see stars, meteors, and maybe a couple of satellites. What you can't see with the naked eye is the tons and tons of space junk currently orbiting our planet. It's estimated that there are more than 20,000 pieces of debris larger than a softball currently in orbit, and half a million pieces so small they can't be tracked.
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Earth's Inner Core Shouldn't Technically Exist

11 February 2018 - 12:29pm
Brandon Specktor, Live Science
One day, about a billion years ago, Earth's inner core had a growth spurt. The molten ball of liquid metal at the center of our planet rapidly crystallized due to lowering temperatures, growing steadily outward until it reached the roughly 760-mile (1,220 kilometers) diameter to which it's thought to extend today.
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Meet Science's Pirate Queen

11 February 2018 - 12:28pm
Ian Graber-Stiehl, The Verge
In cramped quarters at Russia's Higher School of Economics, shared by four students and a cat, sat a server with 13 hard drives. The server hosted Sci-Hub, a website with over 64 million academic papers available for free to anybody in the world. It was the reason that, one day in June 2015, Alexandra Elbakyan, the student and programmer with a futurist streak and a love for neuroscience blogs, opened her email to a message from the world's largest publisher: YOU HAVE BEEN SUED.
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Commonly-Used PTSD Drug Fails Rigorous Trial

10 February 2018 - 12:33am
Andrew Joseph, Stat
TThousands of people with post-traumatic stress disorder have taken the drug prazosin to ease the nightmares and disturbances that stalk their sleep.Numerous studies have shown the drug to be effective at controlling those episodes. But a team of researchers from the Department of Veterans Affairs, seeking to collect more evidence, set out to study the sustained effectiveness of the treatment.
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Is the Universe a Conscious Mind?

10 February 2018 - 12:33am
Philip Goff, Aeon Magazine
In the past 40 or so years, a strange fact about our Universe gradually made itself known to scientists: the laws of physics, and the initial conditions of our Universe, are fine-tuned for the possibility of life. It turns out that, for life to be possible, the numbers in basic physics for example, the strength of gravity, or the mass of the electron must have values falling in a certain range.
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Scientists Mimic Black Hole Effect on Electrons

10 February 2018 - 12:33am
Josh Gabbatiss, The Independent
Using a laser beam one quadrillion times brighter than the Sun, physicists have stopped electrons travelling at near-light speeds for the first time.The experiment produced a quantum mechanical phenomenon that was previously only thought to occur around black holes and quasars.
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Primitive Fish Illuminates Origin of Walking

10 February 2018 - 12:33am
Giorgia Guglielmi, Nature News
The genes and nerve cells that allow people and other mammals to walk around can also be found in a primitive fish known as a skate, according to a study. The findings suggest that the nerve cells essential for walking evolved millions of years earlier than previously thought.
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Did a Comet Kill the Mammoths?

10 February 2018 - 12:32am
Steven Novella, Neurologica
Between 12,800 to 11,500 bp (before present) there was a cold period in North America called the Younger Dryas named after the dryas flower whose pollen is a good marker for such cold periods. During this time the megafauna of North America, including the Mammoth, largely died out. Along with them went the Clovis culture a big game hunting culture with distinctive stone points.
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Eugenics Conference Exposed at University

14 January 2018 - 12:11pm
Ben Van Der Merwe, London Student
A eugenics conference held annually at University College London by an honorary professor, the London Conference on Intelligence, is dominated by a secretive group of white supremacists with neo-Nazi links, London Student can exclusively reveal.
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Revamped Collider Hunts for Cracks in Standard Model

14 January 2018 - 12:10pm
Elizabeth Gibney, Nature

The quest to explore the frontiers of physics will heat up next month in Japan, when beams of high-energy electrons are set to start smashing into their antimatter counterparts at one of the world's premier accelerator laboratories. The experiment, called Belle II, aims to chase down rare, promising hints of new phenomena that would extend the standard model a remarkably successful but incomplete physics theory that describes matter and forces.
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Scientists Decry Raw Pet Food Trend

14 January 2018 - 12:10pm
Nicola Davis, The Guardian
The trend for feeding dogs and cats raw meat has been criticised by scientists, who say it often contains bacteria and parasites that could pose dangers to both pets and their owners.A growing trend has seen pet owners plump for products such as meat, bones and organs which can be bought frozen and then thawed before being fed to dogs and cats.
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