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Hubble Finds Some of Universe's First Galaxies

12 February 2017 - 8:07pm
Irene Klotz, Seeker
By using a quirk of Einstein's general relativity and applying a new technique to remove obscuring light, astronomers have found an ancient population of the universe's first galaxies.
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Can We Stop Brain Cancer With Rabies?

12 February 2017 - 8:06pm
Matt Blois, Science News
A ruthless killer may soon help brain cancer patients. The rabies virus, which kills tens of thousands of people a year, has a rare ability to enter nerve cells and use them as a conduit to infect brain tissue. Now, scientists are trying to mimic this strategy to ferry tumor-killing nanoparticles into brain tumors. So far the approach has been shown to work only in mice. If successful in people, these nanoparticles could one day help doctors send treatment directly to tumors without harming healthy cells.
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3 Sites Where NASA Might Get Its First Mars Rock

12 February 2017 - 8:06pm
Alexandra Witze, Nature

The future of NASA's Mars programme just got a lot more focussed. The agency has narrowed from eight to three the list of potential landing sites for its 2020 rover, which will scoop up Martian rock and soil in the hopes of one day returning them to Earth.
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The Curious Case of Magnetic Cockroaches

12 February 2017 - 8:06pm
MIT Technology Review
Birds are the best-known example of creatures able to sense magnetic fields and to use them for orientation and navigation. Less well known are the magneto-sensing abilities of American cockroaches, which quickly become magnetized when placed in a magnetic field.
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Rare, 'Middleweight' Black Hole Discovered

12 February 2017 - 8:05pm
Lexy Hamilton-Smith, ABC Science
A Queensland scientist has played a vital role in the world-first discovery of a "middleweight" black hole in space, spending 40 years searching the universe to find it.University of Queensland astronomer Associate Professor Holger Baumgardt said it was the missing link between small and super-sized black holes.
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New Uranium-Based Minerals Discovered in Utah

12 February 2017 - 8:05pm
David Grossman, Pop Mech
A Notre Dame graduate student recently found three new minerals while exploring old uranium mines in Utah. The three new minerals, leesite, leszilrdite and redcanyonite, are all new compounds of uranium and other components, allowing researchers to study how different forms of uranium can propagate in the natural environment.
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Why the Flow of Time Is Not an Illusion

12 February 2017 - 8:05pm
Melinda Baldwin, Physics Today
Nowthat enigmatic and ephemeral moment that changes its meaning every instanthas confounded priests, philosophers, and physicists, and with good reason. So writes Richard Muller, a physicist at the University of California, Berkeley, in the opening lines of Now: The Physics of Time (W. W. Norton, 2016).
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How to Stop Astronauts From Going Mad

12 February 2017 - 8:04pm
Paul Marks, BBC Future
"Impulsive, suicidal, sexually-aberrant thrill seeker." What kind of person might that describe? A Big Brother contestant? A Base jumper? A cult leader? Guess again. It is how some US Air Force (USAF) psychiatrists, back in the early days of the space race, imagined the psychological profile of would-be astronauts.
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Low-Carb or Low-Cal? It Doesn't Matter.

12 February 2017 - 8:04pm
Tamar Haspel, Undark
In his new book The Case Against Sugar, journalist Gary Taubes makes, as you might easily guess, a spirited case against sugar. His argument is based on the straightforward idea that sugar contributes to obesity and disease well beyond its calorie content, because it affects human metabolism in a way that encourages fat storage.
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The War on Women's Body Hair

12 February 2017 - 8:03pm
Nadine Ajaka, The Atlantic
I'm sure there was a time when I was not hairy, but I can't remember it. I have an early memory from middle school where a doctor examined my sideburns, which stretched almost down to my jawline, and suggested some pills to slow the growth. She told me they were for people with a lot of facial hair, like me.
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Can We Launch Nuclear Waste Into the Sun?

10 February 2017 - 11:56pm
Fraser Cain, UT
When I look at the Sun, I don't see a warm life-giving orb, nourishing all living creatures here on Earth. No, I see that fiery ball as a cosmic garbage compactor. A place I can dump all my household garbage, to make room for new impulse purchases.I mean, the Sun is right there, not doing anything right? It's hotter than any garbage incinerator, and it's the gravitational well at the heart of the Solar System. Get me a rocket, let's blast that waste into oblivion.
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Eclipse Reveals Surprising Shape of Moon's Shadow

10 February 2017 - 11:09pm
Ethan Siegel, SWaB!

The Earth is nearly a perfect circle, and when the Sun strikes it, it casts a shadow. That circle, during a perfect alignment between the Earth, Sun and Moon, is visible on the lunar surface, and what we see lines up exactly with what we expect: a near-perfect circle. The Moon, too, is nearly a perfect circle. Whether you see it lit up during a full Moon, the faint outline from earthshine during a crescent phase or are viewing it silhouetted against the Sun during a solar eclipse, it, too, appears circular. But if you were to view the shadow the Moon makes on Earth during this time, not only...
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Can Contraception Control Wild Horse Populations?

10 February 2017 - 10:55pm
Ben Masters, Nat Geo

TJ Holmes waited for a clean broadside shot before raising her rifle. She looked through the scope at the grazing horses, slowly exhaled as the crosshairs landed on her target, and squeezed the trigger. A dart flew from the air rifle and hit the mare smack on the hindquarter. The entire herd of horses moved 50 yards in alarm at the sound of the gun.Holmes stayed still until the horses calmed down before picking up the dart. She walked back to our film team.Pretty amazing, isn't it? she said. The PZP fertility control in this dart can keep a mare from becoming pregnant for a year,...
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Simple Solutions for US Energy Policy

10 February 2017 - 10:55pm
Alex B. Berezow, ACSH

Some policy issues are so complicated, there appears to be no good or easy solution. Take foreign policy, for example. With nearly 200 countries in the world, each with its own strategic goals and interests, it is nearly impossible either to ensure that everybody gets along or to craft policies that advance American interests while treating everyone else fairly. Deception and communication barriers, such as language and culture, exacerbate the problem. Indeed, statecraft is a job full of contradiction and frustration.
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Nuclear Power Industry Makes Appeal to Trump

10 February 2017 - 10:55pm
Hannah Northey, Science Mag

The Trump administration's arrival has forced the U.S. nuclear industry to revise its climate-based pitch for government assistance for at-risk reactors.Maria Korsnick, the new head of the Nuclear Energy Institute, told skeptical Wall Street analysts in New York today that supporting financially struggling, aging reactors is critical to curbing heat-trapping emissions, and that states like Illinois, New York and now Connecticut are stepping up with financial support.
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Origin of Ice on Mercury Shrouded in Mystery

10 February 2017 - 10:55pm
Elizabeth Howell, Seeker
Although Mercury is the closest planet to the sun, some of its craters hide water ice in their shaded depths but how much ice is there, and where exactly did it come from?A new study has part of the answer, suggesting that the ice is around 50 meters thick on average, but there is considerable uncertainty with that measurement. What kind of comets deposited the water there in the first place, however, is a mystery.
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MRI Developer Sir Peter Mansfield Dead at Age 83

10 February 2017 - 10:55pm
BBC News
A Nobel laureate who failed his school exams before going on to pioneer body scanning technology has died aged 83.Sir Peter Mansfield led a team in the 1970s that developed Magnetic Resonance Imaging, one of the most important breakthroughs in modern medicine.The son of a gas fitter, he left school at the age of 15 before embarking on a career at the University of Nottingham.Vice-chancellor Professor Sir David Greenaway said his work "changed our world for the better".
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Giant Ancient Goose Was a Fighter

15 January 2017 - 10:13am
Bob Yirka, PhysOrg.com
(Phys.org)A small team of researchers from Italy, Norway and Austria has found evidence of an ancient extinct goose relative that once lived in what is now central Italy. In their paper published in Royal Society Open Science, the team describes the fossils they found, what they suggest the bird once looked like and possibly how it behaved.
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Largest Flu Outbreak in Cats Prompts Quarantine

15 January 2017 - 10:13am
Andy Newman, N.Y. Times
In an industrial corner of Queens on Monday, on the second floor of a cavernous warehouse, in a gated-off area known as Pod C, a worker in a hazmat suit, goggles and a respirator mask sat on the floor of a metal cell.She held a colored string with a ball dangling from it. With the other hand, she petted a cat. Psswsswss, the woman said through the mask. The cat arched its back against her latex-gloved hand.
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Clothing Lint a Growing Environmental Problem

15 January 2017 - 10:13am
Melody Bomgardner, C & E News
For many people who enjoy exploring the outdoors, a jacket made of polyester fleece is a wardrobe staple. The fluffy material is warm, lightweight, long-wearing, and often made from recycled soda bottles.But researchers are increasingly worried that fibers from fleece and other synthetic garments are making journeys of their own to soils, rivers, and oceans where they can damage wildlife and even end up in the human food supply.
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