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If Universe Is Expanding, Why Aren't We?

30 July 2017 - 10:02am
Sabine Hossenfelder, Forbes
It's tough to wrap your head around four dimensions. Scientists have known that the universe expands since the 1930s, but whether we expand along with it is still one of the questions I am asked most frequently. The less self-conscious simply inform me that the universe doesn't expand but everything in it shrinks because how could we tell the difference?The best answer to these questions is, as usual, a lot of math. But it's hard to find a decent answer online that is not a pile of equations, so here's a conceptual take on it.
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First 'Exomoon' Responsible for Mystery Signal?

28 July 2017 - 8:37pm
Paul Rincon, BBC
Astronomers have discovered an object that could be the first known moon located beyond the Solar System.If genuine, the "exomoon" is likely to be about the size and mass of Neptune, and circles a planet the size of Jupiter but with 10 times the mass.The signal was detected by Nasa's Kepler Space Telescope; astronomers now plan to carry out follow-up observations with Hubble in October.
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Boring Technology Poised for a Revolution

28 July 2017 - 8:37pm
The Economist
A BIG hole in the car park at SpaceX's headquarters in Los Angeles is the first visible evidence of another of Elon Musk's ventures. Mr Musk who, besides leading SpaceX, a rocket company, also runs Tesla, a maker of electric cars, is going into the tunnelling business. The goal of the Boring Company, as he dubs his new enterprise, is to dig tunnels faster and more cheaply than is possible at the moment.
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SpaceX in Top Seven Most Valuable Private Companies

28 July 2017 - 8:37pm
Chang & Benner, NYT
SpaceX, the rocket maker founded by billionaire Elon Musk, has raised up to $350 million in new financing and is now valued at around $21 billion, making it one of the most valuable privately held companies in the world.SpaceX's new financing was disclosed in public filings that were obtained by Equidate, a marketplace for private company stock. SpaceX declined to comment. .
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Even the Thinnest Copper Films Are Not Flat

28 July 2017 - 8:37pm
Emily Conover, Science News
Like the surface of an alien planet, thin sheets of copper display a complex topography of ridges and valleys. These never-before-seen undulations may spell trouble for electronic gadgets: The zigzagging surface could contribute to the electrical resistance of miniature copper wires that snake throughout computer chips.Using a scanning tunneling microscope, scientists observed nanoscale peaks and dips on a sheet of copper, with angles of a few degrees, researchers report in the July 28 Science. When we saw that, we were absolutely shocked, says materials scientist John Boland of Trinity...
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Cassini Finds Organic Molecules in Titan's Atmosphere

28 July 2017 - 8:37pm
Matt Williams, UT

Titan, Saturn's largest moon, has been a source of mystery ever since scientists began studying it over a century ago. These mysteries have only deepened with the arrival of the Cassini-Huygens mission in the system back in 2004. In addition to finding evidence of a methane cycle, prebiotic conditions and organic chemistry, the Cassini-Huygens mission has also discovered that Titan may have the ingredient that help give rise to life.Such is the argument made in a recent study by an international team of scientists. After examining data obtained by the Cassini space probe, they identified a...
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Slug Mucus Inspires Surgical Adhesive Formula

28 July 2017 - 8:37pm
Michael Torrice, C&E News

To help cling to leaves and other surfaces, some slugs secrete a sticky mucus. Engineers have used this slug secretion as inspiration to develop a synthetic adhesive that is significantly stronger than commercially available surgical glues (Science 2017, DOI: 10.1126/science.aah6362).It's a really elegant and creative design to make tough adhesives that work in wet environments, says Mark W. Grinstaff of Boston University, who was not involved in the work.
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Thirty Meter Telescope Finally Nears Permit

28 July 2017 - 8:37pm
Eric Berger, Ars Tech
The Big Island of Hawaii has perhaps the best astronomical seeing conditions in the Northern Hemisphere, and the University of California system and Caltech have a $1.4 billion plan to build the world's largest telescope there. The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) would open up an unprecedented window into the early history of the Universeand other unknown wonders. But some native Hawaiians do not want further telescopes built on the sacred summit of Mauna Kea, which at nearly 14,000 feet is the highest point in the chain of Pacific Islands.
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