Apparently a concept I developed in my spare time in 2009, which I dubbed "posthuman factors," is very similar to some guy's PhD dissertation in 2010 in which he also used the term posthuman factors. (And I don't mean everything in his dissertation, but there's a lot of overlap.)

I recently learned of this through a Wikipedia article I discovered (created in April 2011 by user Nikiburri) called "Posthuman factors." It has a good summary:
In general, posthuman factors addresses the intersection of design practices that includes (1) the design of posthumans, (2) designing for such posthumans, especially in safe and sustainable ways, and (3) designing the design methodologies that will supersede human-centered design (i.e., "posthuman-centered design", or the processes of design that posthumans employ).
Interestingly, it cites my IEET article "Why You Should Care About (Post)Human Factors," published Jan 8, 2010, yet claims that posthuman factors was first "articulated" by Dr. Haakon Faste in his Jan 2010 doctoral dissertation "Posthuman Factors: How Perceptual Robotic Art Will Save Humanity from Extinction."

Most likely we were both thinking about it and writing about it at around the same time (one would assume that, as with my articles mentioned above, the writing actually started in 2009). And then there are whatever projects that lead to this particular synthesis of concepts; e.g. in my case it connects at least as far back to my attempt to describe an interface point of view for future human/robot/posthuman/etc. interactions ("Would You Still Love Me If I Was A Robot?").

But the Wikipedia pages are a bit annoying. The Posthuman factors page has a link to a wikipedia page for Haakon Faste (created by the same user Nikiburri) which informs us that he is a leading figure in the field of posthuman factors and that he coined the term in 2010. Well, guess what---I posted my article "Do We Need a Posthuman Factors Discipline?" in December 2009 on my blog, so I guess that means I coined it first.

But it's nice to know that I started a new field. And I'm pleased that at least one other person is thinking about these issues.