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    Stone Age Scandinavians Were Lactose Intolerant
    By News Staff | April 1st 2010 12:00 AM | Print | E-mail | Track Comments
    Researchers from Uppsala and Stockholm Universities say that the hunter-gatherers who inhabited the southern coast of Scandinavia 4,000 years ago were lactose intolerant.

    The conclusion suggests that today's Scandinavians are not descended from the Stone Age people in question but from a group that arrived later. Results of the research have been published in the journal BMC Evolutionary Biology.

    "This group of hunter-gatherers differed significantly from modern Swedes in terms of the DNA sequence that we generally associate with a capacity to digest lactose into adulthood," says Anna Linderholm, formerly of the Archaeological Research Laboratory, Stockholm University.

    According to the researchers, two possible explanations exist for the DNA differences.

    "One possibility is that these differences are evidence of a powerful selection process, through which the Stone Age hunter-gatherers' genes were lost due to some significant advantage associated with the capacity to digest milk," says Linderholm. "The other possibility is that we simply are not descended from this group of Stone Age people."

    The capacity to consume unprocessed milk into adulthood is regarded as having been of great significance for human prehistory.

    "This capacity is closely associated with the transition from hunter-gatherer to agricultural societies," says Anders Götherström of the Department of Evolutionary Biology at Uppsala University.

    "In the present case, we are inclined to believe that the findings are indicative of what we call "gene flow," in other words, migration to the region at some later time of some new group of people, with whom we are genetically similar," he says. "This accords with the results of previous studies."




    Citation: Malmstrom et al., 'High frequency of lactose intolerance in a prehistoric hunter-gatherer population in northern Europe', BMC Evolutionary Biology, 2010, 10(1), 89; doi: 10.1186/1471-2148-10-89