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Chessboxing For Science

What does chessboxing have to do with science? Let me tell you a little story...It all started...

A New School Of Thought

How do we learn best? It depends on the individual! In the video below, Salman Khan is demonstrating...

Citizen Scientist 2.0

What does the future of science look like? About a year ago, I was asked this same question...

The Open Science Summit Is Almost Here! (And I Need Your Help!)

“The sweetest and most inoffensive path of life leads through the avenues of science and learning...

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Andrea KuszewskiRSS Feed of this column.

Andrea is a Behavior Therapist and Consultant for children on the autism spectrum, residing in the state of FL; her background is in cognitive neuroscience and psychology, with expertise in Asperger’s

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There has been much debate surrounding Ray Kurzweil and his talk at the Singularity Summit on August 14th 2010, where he discussed reverse engineering the brain, among other things. He was criticized quite harshly by science blogger and biologist PZ Myers (of ScienceBlogs), based mainly on a second-hand account of the presentation by a journalist who covered the event. Ray has since responded to these criticisms, and I have collected the links to those arguments/responses here.
Well, you knew this day was coming. Ray Kurzweil, futurist and author, was attacked for his supposed lack of understanding of how the brain functions, by popular biologist and ScienceBlogs blogger PZ Myers earlier this week.


Image courtesy of Singularity Hub
Sexual images trigger chemical reactions in your brain, which in turn compel us to act in specific ways, or be drawn to certain things, or motivated to engage in particular behaviors. It's common nowadays to have consultants whose job it is to find out exactly how your brain interprets images in order to invoke the greatest possible sexual response. Sounds like a fun job, eh? Sex Research Consultant: Totally hot job in 2011.

The mind is a very complex thing, but when it comes to sex, it's really pretty simple. How simple? This is your brain on sex...
What happens in your brain when you experience pleasure? Why are fantasies so powerful? Why do our brains love dopamine so much? Why do some images arouse, while others turn us off? Why are the most attractive people often not the ones we are most drawn to sexually? How can you create the longest neurological orgasm possible?

For the next several weeks, I will be writing a series of articles centered around the topic, The Science of Pleasure. Because there is soooo much good information on the science of how and why we derive pleasure from certain things, I felt this should be a series of articles, rather than trim it down to one post. Sound exciting? Well, it IS.
It has been known for quite some time that exercise promotes neurogenesis, but now a study by Leuner, Glasper, and Gould, published by PLoS ONE this month, claims that the most intimate form of exercise - sexual activity - can produce the same effects.  And better yet- having multiple, repeated sexual experiences results in a greater positive effect than a single experience alone. Added bonus: it reduces anxiety as well.  I love that kind of data!
Dear gentle readers and the lovely and talented Scientific Blogging/Science 2.0 community,

You may have noticed that I have not been around much lately, and I felt I should let everyone know what has been going on. I have recently left Boston *wiping tears*, this time transplanting to Tallahassee, Florida for a yet-undetermined period of time. I am starting a few new ventures and projects which are quite exciting, so this was a necessary move right now.  I apologize for the lack of new posts lately, as I have been trying to orchestrate this whole move as swiftly and efficiently as possible- but you know things never work out as planned. I will continue to write here at Science 2.0, so no need to panic- you can put down the pitchforks and cancel the protest.