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Chessboxing For Science

What does chessboxing have to do with science? Let me tell you a little story...It all started...

A New School Of Thought

How do we learn best? It depends on the individual! In the video below, Salman Khan is demonstrating...

Citizen Scientist 2.0

What does the future of science look like? About a year ago, I was asked this same question...

The Open Science Summit Is Almost Here! (And I Need Your Help!)

“The sweetest and most inoffensive path of life leads through the avenues of science and learning...

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Andrea KuszewskiRSS Feed of this column.

Andrea is a Behavior Therapist and Consultant for children on the autism spectrum, residing in the state of FL; her background is in cognitive neuroscience and psychology, with expertise in Asperger’s

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We have all heard the term, "Nutty Professor", which brings to mind the highly intelligent, yet socially inept individual; excelling in the academic world, yet failing miserably in the realm of common sense. Is there an evolutionary explanation for why this phenomenon exists?

Bruce Charlton, Editor-in-Chief of the journal Medical Hypotheses, says "yes". He calls these people 'Clever Sillies' in his article, "Clever Sillies- Why the High IQ Lack Common Sense". He proposes that high IQ is not just a cognitive ability, but also a cognitive disposition. He says,
We look at heroes and do-gooders as a special sort of breed; people who possess extraordinary traits of altruism, or self-less concern for the well-being of others, even at the expense of their own existence. On the other end, sociopaths also have an extraordinary set of traits, such as extreme selfishness, lack of impulse control, no respect for rules, and no conscience.
How can companies get the best possible performance out of their employees? Let them do whatever they want! And furthermore, don't offer incentives. Sound counter-intuitive? Not if you look at what research has shown regarding the economics of motivation.
What is the difference between "intelligence" and "genius"?  Creativity, of course!