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2014: Postmortem

Oh no! I forgot to post a personal postmortem1 for the year 2014 like I did for the previous year...

Cognitive Abstraction Manifolds

A few days ago I started thinking about abstractions whilst reading Surfaces and Essences, a recent...

On That Which is Called “Memory”

Information itself is a foundational concept for cognitive science theories.But the very definition...

Polymorphism in Mental Development

Adaptability and uninterrupted continuous operations are important features of mental development...

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Samuel KenyonRSS Feed of this column.

Robotics software engineer, AI researcher, interaction designer (IxD). Also (as Sam Vanivray) filmmaker, actor.

Working on my new sci-fi movie to be filmed in 2016:
BRUTE SANITY... Read More »

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Games are not just for fun anymore--and indeed "fun" is not a good enough description for the psychology of gameplay anyway. Designers are trying to "gamify" applications which traditionally were not game-like at all. And this isn't limited to just the Serious Games movement that's been around for several years.

This is a type of design thinking that has spread from the gaming world and is now merging with the User Experience Design / Interaction Design world.


Recently I attended a presentation at MIT by Jeff Lieberman called "It's Not What You Think: An Evolutionary Theory of Spiritual Enlightenment."

Lieberman is a science-educated artist and host of a TV show called Time Warp. He's a relatively good presenter, and given his credentials, one would expect him to juxtapose disparate fields of science and art. However, the downside is that one is not left with a single solid believable conclusion or theory--or at least I wasn't. Of course, this was also the first time Lieberman gave this talk, so he might improve it in the future.

Today I was at the 2011 Embedded Systems Conference / DesignCon exposition. I typically attend technology expos in Boston, keeping an eye out for devices and software that I might be able to use in my job. But of course, I'm also interested in what embedded systems technology will enable in the near future.

There wasn't anything mind-blowingly cool, but I will mention a few things that may be of interest to my readers.

Watson

I recently happened upon an article [1] about the work of Jennifer Lerner:
Lerner is best known for her research on two topics: the effects of emotion on judgment and decision making, and the effects of accountability on judgment and decision making. Recently, along with a number of National Science Foundation-supported scientists, she appeared on the PBS program "Mind Over Money," a look at the 2008 stock market crash and the irrational financial decisions people make.
How the human emotional architecture fails us in modern life has been an interest of mine for a long time.
I'm Back

I'm Back

Sep 10 2011 | comment(s)

I will resume posting soon!

I took a break from this blog for a couple months. However, I did not stop writing—I was working on fiction, specifically screenwriting. I used to write screenplays and short stories in high school, but it’s been a while. I sort of had to relearn how to do it. To go along with the screenwriting, I also got some acting training. It was quite fun.

Stay tuned.

Apparently a concept I developed in my spare time in 2009, which I dubbed "posthuman factors," is very similar to some guy's PhD dissertation in 2010 in which he also used the term posthuman factors. (And I don't mean everything in his dissertation, but there's a lot of overlap.)