Geology

Why There's A Bend In The Appalachian Mountain Chain

The Appalachian mountain chain runs along a nearly straight line from Alabama to Newfoundland— 1,500 miles- except for a curious bend in Pennsylvania and New York. Why it bends has been a mystery. When the North American and African continental plates col ...

Article - News Staff - Jul 19 2014 - 9:30pm

Red Planet: Global Geologic Map Of Mars Shows It's Older Than Thought

A new global geologic map of Mars is the most thorough representation of the "Red Planet's" surface, bringing together observations and scientific findings from four orbiting spacecraft that have been acquiring data for more than 16 years. ...

Article - News Staff - Jul 20 2014 - 6:39pm

The Live Volcano Of Jeju Island

In Jeju, a place emerging as a world-famous vacation spot with natural tourism resources, a recent study revealed a volcanic eruption occurred on the island. The Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) indicated that there are the trac ...

Article - News Staff - Jul 22 2014 - 5:54pm

Western Drought: Underground Water Loss Greater Threat To Water Supply Than Previously Realized

A new study has found that more than 75 percent of the water loss in the drought-stricken Colorado River Basin since late 2004 came from underground resources., which means the extent of groundwater loss may pose a greater threat to the water supply of th ...

Article - News Staff - Jul 27 2014 - 9:30am

Like The Bahamas' Great Bank? Thank Dust From The Sahara

A new study suggests that Saharan dust played a major role in the formation of the Bahamas islands. Researchers from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science showed that iron-rich Saharan dust provides the nutrients ...

Article - News Staff - Jul 24 2014 - 5:24pm

Natural Fracking: How Long Did It Take?

Hydraulic fracturing is in the news because more natural gas has meant substantially fewer carbon emissions- and it has also been implicated in a variety of environmental issues. Man is doing what nature has always done, albeit on a different time scale. ...

Article - News Staff - Aug 4 2014 - 2:29pm

Jerusalem's Western Wall- Why Some Stones Have No Wear After 2,000 Years

The biggest mystery in the mid-east is why countries of one religion won't put the country of another religion on any geographical maps in any of its schools, but the second biggest mystery is why many of the oldest parts of Jerusalem's Western ...

Article - News Staff - Aug 11 2014 - 9:40am

Foreshock Series Controlled Chile Earthquake Rupture

A long lasting foreshock series controlled the rupture process of this year's great earthquake near Iquique in northern Chile, according to an international research team The earthquake was heralded by a three quarter year long foreshock series of ev ...

Article - News Staff - Aug 13 2014 - 3:57pm

Stressing Faults From Slow-Slip Earthquakes May Portend Doom For Tokyo

Tokyo is a city of more than 13 million people and they are no strangers to earthquakes. The city, like much of Japan, has been devastated by earthquakes in the past and likely will be again- but when? Ongoing slow-slip earthquakes can't usually be f ...

Article - News Staff - Aug 14 2014 - 12:11pm

Quantifying Earthquake Hazards In The Pacific Northwest- It's Complicated

Nearly forgotten research from decades ago complicates the task of quantifying earthquake hazards in the Pacific Northwest, according to a new report. The report focuses on the Cascadia subduction zone—a giant active fault that slants eastward beneath the ...

Article - News Staff - Aug 16 2014 - 10:01pm