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Microsoft Developer Allison Farris To Compete In Miss America

Next month, a Microsoft developer, a classical pianist, and a philanthropist for kids' health will...

Modern Human-Like Gripping Capabilities Existed In Ancestors 500,000 Years Ago

A technique used to produce stone tools that were first found 500,000 years ago is likely to have...

Psychologists Discover Your Personality May Change Over 50 Years

Does your base personality change over time? Psychologists are conflicted over that, but Galileo...

Exoplanets Containing Water May Be More Common Than Believed

Some exoplanets with masses two to four times the size of Earth can be explained by large amounts...

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Being a green consumer is hard work, according to new research funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). The study highlights a need for more practical help and incentives for green consumers, if we are to achieve a more sustainable society.

The University of Leeds-led study found that consumers who try to live a sustainable lifestyle have difficulty deciding which product to buy. "Consumers find that being green or ethical is a very hard, time consuming, and emotional experience," says Dr William Young.

Strange Brew

Strange Brew

Feb 11 2007 | comment(s)

In side-by-side taste tests, pub-goers agree: “MIT Brew” tastes better than Budweiser — as long as tasters don’t learn beforehand that the secret ingredient is balsamic vinegar.

It sounds more like a fraternity prank than a psychology experiment, but the beer-guzzling participants in a recent study were doing their part for psychology. In this case, helping researchers determine just what it is about consumers’ knowledge of food products that af-fects their taste judgments.


Does Knowledge Of Food Products Affect Taste Judgment?

Fermions tend to avoid each other and cannot "travel" in close proximity. Demonstrated by a team at the Institut d'optique (CNRS/Université Paris 11, Orsay-Palaiseau), this result is described in detail in the January 25, 2007 issue of Nature. It marks a major advance in our understanding of phenomena at a quantum scale.

For many years, the theory of quantum mechanics stipulated that certain particles, the fermions(1), were incapable of "travelling" in close proximity.

Aggressive research currently underway brings hope of dramatic advances in breast cancer management, according to a new review. Published in the March 15, 2007 issue of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the review reveals that new approaches in breast cancer imaging, investigations into the timing of chemotherapy, and research on breast cancer vaccines may lead to exciting new nonsurgical tools for the physician treating breast cancer patients. These new tools may significantly alter current screening and treatment paradigms used by surgical oncologists, as well improving the care of patients.

Our understanding of breast cancer has changed since Dr. William Halsted started performing radical mastectomies in the 1880s.

Mice engineered to have cleft palates can be rescued in utero by injecting the mothers with a small molecule to correct the defect, say scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital. In addition to shedding light on the biology of cleft palate, the research raises hopes that it may one day be possible to prevent many types of human birth defects by using a similar vaccination-type technique in pregnant women likely to have affected fetuses.

"This is a really important baby step that opens the door to the development of fetal therapies," said pediatric craniofacial surgeon Michael Longaker, MD.

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions have found a second genetic defect that accounts for previously unexplained forms of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), a disorder that weakens bones, sometimes results in frequent fractures and is sometimes fatal.

The affected gene contains the information for a protein designated P3H1 (prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1), also known as leprecan. P3H1 is part of a complex of proteins that is crucial for refining collagen to its final form. Collagen is an important building block for bone.