Science & Society

In his just published final book, "Brief Answers to the Big Questions," physicist Satephen Hawking wrote, "There is no God. No one directs the universe" but in a universe where only 6% of what must exist is even matter that can be detected, the science community is unwilling to be as definitive as he was.

It may be that God is in the gaps, and different people have different definitions for what that is. Yet it may be perpetuating the false narrative that religion is on one pole and science is on another.

America is the most science literate country in the world, we are dominant in Nobel prizes and science output, and we are thankful we are not France, but a new survey by Harris shows that we still have a long way to go.

The results of the new survey reveal that 47 percent of people ages 18 to 37, our future leaders, have become convinced by efforts to promote alternatives to medicine and think they can cure cancer with food or supplements or ancient Chinese wisdom - 40 percent overall.

How did we get here?

Three ways.

Comic books of the 1950s and 1960s made a point of their potential to terrify, with anthologies from Entertaining Comics, such as Haunt of Fear, Vault of Horror, and Tales of the Crypt, boasting covers with straplines such as “Within these pages dwell creatures from the terrifying beyond!”

Whether you believe transgender men are men or transgender women are women you cannot deny the basic fact that we exist.   You may not like that a group of people exist.  You may disagree with how a group of people either choose or are compelled by their specific biology to live.  You may feel disgust or disdain.  You may not and have a right to not like anyone you want but it is an observational fact of life transgender people exist.  It is an observational fact of life that some transgender people take medical steps to change themselves in every technologically available way.  

The Breakthrough Prize Foundation has breathlessly announced that "acclaimed actor, producer and philanthropist Pierce Brosnan" will host the Breakthrough Prize ceremony, which they have self-declared is the “Oscars of Science”, on November 4th.

Does 0.4% chocolate ice cream and 99.6% vanilla not make vanilla? What Senator Warren does not get is that her ancestors did not pay the price of being American Indian in the last 200 + years at least.   That is why it is bogus for her to claim that identity.

Gender critical feminism being used as a smoke screen for anti-transgender views is  a direct consequence of the transgender community abandoning the notion of brain sex.  Brain sex was a testable hypothesis that has since been tested out as true.  Yet so much activism has been built on gender identity.  Two ideas which are based on social realities gender roles and markers of identity.  This left a way for hateful people who call themselves feminist to sound reasonable. 

 

The Transsexual Brain Is Real DEAL WITH IT.

 

Once upon a time, non-fat milk (the cream removed) was only used for fattening pigs. It was clearly a technological process to remove the cream but it is not considered "unnatural" - in 2012, the Obama administration even told schools to start serving it as a healthier alternative to regular milk. Meanwhile, the same administration delayed a salmon because it had a gene from a similar salmon that would allow it to grow all year 'round. The second technology was "unnatural."

This originated as my answer to a question on the Quora question and answer site: "In what general knowledge domains do alternatives to Wikipedia exist that are significantly superior?". Of course there are examples of much better specialist encyclopedias for various knowledge domains. But you can also do better than Wikipedia using content derived from Wikipedia itself. I think my own new wikis are an example of this, for a simple reason. Because we can fix various errors that can't be fixed there and add new content that can't be added there.

Once upon a time we all knew what censorship was, who the good and bad guys were, and what could be done to make the world a better place. Look up the noun “censor” in the Oxford English Dictionary and you’ll find an outline of a much-told story under definition 2 (b):

“An official in some countries whose duty it is to inspect all books, journals, dramatic pieces, etc, before publication, to secure that they shall contain nothing immoral, heretical, or offensive to the government.”

Attributing the first instance of this usage to the English poet John Milton, the lexicographers illustrated it with a quotation from his anti-censorship pamphlet, Areopagitica (1644):