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Rich Or Poor, Scammers Don't Cheat Because They Need The Money — They Cheat Because They're Cheaters

Why do people cheat? When we hear that a poor person scammed others out of money, we may attribute...

Human-Animal Hybrids Are Coming, To Grow Organs For Transplant - What Are The Implications?

Around the world thousands of people are on organ donor waiting lists. While some of those people...

Could Light And Noise From Earth Attract Alien Attention?

Since the first use of electric lamps in the 19th century, society hasn’t looked back. Homes...

Lyme Disease Is Not A Military Bioweapon

Could Lyme disease in the U.S. be the result of an accidental release from a secret bioweapons...

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Personality tests will not judge you on how you look, the clothes you wear or where you went to school, so why are people so wary of them? Credit: Shutterstock

By Nick Haslam, University of Melbourne

By Jon Tennant, Imperial College London

Access to research is limited worldwide by the high cost of subscription journals, which force readers to pay for their content.

The use of scientific research in new studies, educational material and news is often restricted by these publishers, who require authors to sign over their rights and then control what is done with the published work. In response, a movement that would allow free access to information and no restrictions on reuse – termed open access – is growing.

By Helen King, The Open University

It wasn’t that long ago that it was believed that regular periods were essential for women's health and in their absence, a loss of blood through another orifice was a fair substitute.

In a classical Greek text linked to Hippocrates, the Aphorisms, it was written that “a nosebleed is a good thing if the menstrual period is suppressed”. So too was vomiting blood. And these beliefs lasted in western Europe until the middle of the 19th century.

But what was the theory behind what now seems a pretty alarming set of beliefs?

1. A build up of blood caused illness



By Neil Morris, University of Leeds

Over the past couple of years, massive open online courses (MOOCs) have taken the academic world by storm. Despite much debate about whether the idea of running free online courses for everyone is both a good and cost-effective idea in the long-run, MOOCs are teaching universities valuable lessons about how students want to learn.

By Tanya Hill, University of Melbourne 

Have you ever considered our cosmic address? It’s a fun device I’ve often used to help students get a grasp on our place in the universe.

For example, I work at the Melbourne Planetarium, 2 Booker St, Spotswood, Victoria, Australia, Earth, Solar System, Orion Arm, Milky Way Galaxy, Local Group, Virgo Cluster, Local Supercluster, the Universe.

By Barbara Sahakian, University of Cambridge and Muzaffer Kaser, University of Cambridge