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Rich Or Poor, Scammers Don't Cheat Because They Need The Money — They Cheat Because They're Cheaters

Why do people cheat? When we hear that a poor person scammed others out of money, we may attribute...

Human-Animal Hybrids Are Coming, To Grow Organs For Transplant - What Are The Implications?

Around the world thousands of people are on organ donor waiting lists. While some of those people...

Could Light And Noise From Earth Attract Alien Attention?

Since the first use of electric lamps in the 19th century, society hasn’t looked back. Homes...

Lyme Disease Is Not A Military Bioweapon

Could Lyme disease in the U.S. be the result of an accidental release from a secret bioweapons...

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Somewhere in this much-incinerated plant lies valuable medicine: perhaps a treatment for cancer or an antidote to obesity.Prensa 420/Flickr, CC BY-NC

By David J. Allsop, University of Sydney and Iain S. McGregor, University of Sydney

Medicinal cannabis is back in the news again after a planned trial to grow it in Norfolk Island was blocked by the federal government last week. The media is ablaze with political rumblings and tales of public woe, but what does science have to say on the subject?


The Brazilian Atlantic forest is home to animals, birds, plants, and tourist trains. Credit: EPA

By Cristina Banks-Leite, Imperial College London

Brazil’s Atlantic forest – Mata Atlântica – is one of the world’s great biodiversity hotspots, rivalling even the Amazon. Running on and off for several thousand kilometres along the coast, the forest is home to 10,000 plant species that don’t exist anywhere else, more bird species than the whole of Europe, and more than half of the country’s threatened animal species.

By Bryan Roche, National University of Ireland Maynooth

We’re getting more stupid. That’s one point made in a recent article in the New Scientist, reporting on a gradual decline in IQs in developed countries such as the UK, Australia and the Netherlands. Such research feeds into a long-held fascination with testing human intelligence. Yet such debates are too focused on IQ as a life-long trait that can’t be changed. Other research is beginning to show the opposite.


There are some massive galaxies out there, and we now know a little about their early life.Credit: Lauro Roger McAllister/Flickr, CC BY

By Edward Taylor, University of Melbourne

A piece of the galaxy formation puzzle may have fallen into place, thanks to a team of European and American astronomers peering into the depths of our early universe.


A key part of civilization? Credit: E Photos, CC BY-SA