Aging

For patients with advanced Parkinson disease who have involuntary movements, deep brain stimulation has been found to be an effective treatment for reducing motor disability and improving quality of life. 

Some recent studies suggest that
deep brain stimulation
plus medical therapy is better than medical therapy alone for patients with  Parkinson disease and early motor complications. Most clinical studies have excluded patients older than 75 years of age, although no specific age cutoff has been set. 


Children learn many skills simply by watching people around them. Without any explicit instructions, youngsters figure out how to do things like press a button to operate the television and twist a knob to open a door.

Scholars have taken this further and found that children as young as age 2 intuitively use mathematical concepts such as probability to help make sense of the world around them.


Exercising to improve our cardiovascular strength may protect us from cognitive impairment as we age, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated Institut universitaire de gératrie de Montréal Research Centre.

The researchers worked with 31 young people between the ages of 18 and 30 and 54 older participants aged between 55 and 75. This enabled the team to compare the older participants within their peer group and against the younger group who obviously have not begun the aging processes in question. None of the participants had physical or mental health issues that might influence the study outcome.


The "Great Recession" and over 90 million Americans unemployed has impacted everything except the stock market and hole sales of wealthy elites, but 40 percent of elders reported a decrease in "financial strain" between 2006 and 2010.  


As children learn arithmetic, they gradually switch from solving problems by counting on their fingers to pulling facts from memory. That comes more easily for some kids than for others and no one knows why but new brain images and a longitudinal provide some clues to how the brain reorganizes itself as children learn math facts.


Though being overweight and obese is linked to many health issues, everything from sleep apnea and an incredibly broad metabolic syndrome designation to stranger categories like pre-diabetes, there are lots of instances where obese people survive better and live longer. Scholars term it a paradox but in reality weight and BMI are not magic bullets, curing them will not stop diseases nor will having them be a death sentence.


It has been understood for many years that tendons are highly prone to injury and that this likelihood increases as they age. Why this happens is currently poorly understood. A recent study went about examining the mechanisms that cause aging in the tendons of horses and find it may be possible to design better treatment for humans.


Studies have shown that being a 'night owl', like people who claim to multitask, is something of a myth - people perform better in the mornings whether they are night owls or morning people people - and a new study finds that becomes more pronounced with age.

Older adults tested in the morning not only perform better on demanding cognitive tasks but also activate the same brain networks responsible for paying attention and suppressing distraction as younger adults, according to a study in Psychology and Aging. The authors say this some of the strongest evidence yet that there are noticeable differences in brain function across the day for older adults.


Baby Boomers, a trend in births that happened when soldiers returned home from World War II, started off their lives being critical of American culture and having a sense of entitlement about how the world should reshape itself to suit them. But now, compared to Generation X and Millennials, they may be the last group with a true sense of responsibility.

While Generation X got validation from Winona Ryder characters and Millennials claim to be above working because rent and health insurance is handled by parents, Baby Boomers continue on because they must - even when it comes to the gym.
 
Few seem to enjoy it, they instead know they will be worse off later if they don't make the effort now.


Over 5 million people in the U.S. have Alzheimer's disease. It is the most common form of dementia and is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S. Desperate families latch onto just about any possible treatment, including supplements. Do they work? Not so far.

But in a retrospective study, older adults involved in the 
Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI)
study were assessed with neuropsychological tests and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) every six months.  The group included 229 older adults who were cognitively normal; 397 who were diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment; and 193 with AD.