Technology

Scientists have developed a scalable, next-generation platelet bioreactor to generate fully functional human platelets in vitro


A new single-cell technique can help investigate how the environment affects our development and the traits we inherit from our parents. It can be used to map all of the 'epigenetic marks' on the DNA within a single cell,which will boost understanding of embryonic development, enhance clinical applications like cancer therapy and even reduce the number of mice used in research.



A site called Social Predictor (sociadictor.com) predicts future trends based on the number of tweets, sentiment of tweets, number of news stories and sentiment of the news stories about celebrities and culture. It can also try and predict stock prices or daily sales of a product, based on the chatter related to user-input keywords, such as a stock ticker or the name.

The creators said trading strategy based on their model outperformed other baseline strategies by between 1.4 percent and nearly 11 percent and did better than the Dow Jones Industrial Average during a four-month simulation. 

Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have found a successful way of identifying bird sounds from large audio collections, by using recordings of individual birds and of dawn choruses to identify characteristics of bird sounds.

They took advantage of large datasets of sound recordings provided by the British Library Sound Archive, and online sources such as the Dutch archive Xeno Canto.


The Affordable Care Act and data portability is forcing health care providers, and the vendors who service them, to accelerate development of tools that can handle an expected deluge of data and information about patients, providers and outcomes.

The volume of data is daunting - so are concerns about interoperability, security and the ability to adapt rapidly to the lessons in the data, writes Dana Gardner at Big Data Journal.

That is why Boundaryless Information Flow, Open Platform 3.0 adaptation, and security for the healthcare industry are headline topics for The Open Group’s upcoming event, Enabling Boundaryless Information Flow on July 21 and 22 in Boston, he notes.

Corticosteroid drugs used in inhalers by children with asthma may suppress their growth, suggest two new systematic reviews published in The Cochrane Library which focus on the effects of inhaled corticosteroid drugs (ICS) on growth rates.

The authors found children's growth slowed in the first year of treatment, although the effects were minimized by using lower doses.


Is it true that you can discern how someone votes based on their Google search history related to science and health issues? It seems to be so, in a majority of cases.

Republicans search for information about the weather, climate change and global warming during extremely hot or cold spells while Democrats search those terms when they experience changes in the average temperatures.

Corey Lang of the University of Rhode Island tracked how the temperature fluctuations and rainfall that Americans experience daily in their own cities make them scour the Internet in search of information about climate change and global warming.

To do so, he used data from Google Trends, local weather stations and election results.



George Dyson. Credit: edge.org

If you read about Big Data for very long, a quote from science historian George Dyson is sure to come up: "Big data is what happened when the cost of keeping information became less than the cost of throwing it away." 

That will be a platform to talk about the challenges, etc.

But there is a bigger problem that shows the challenges of Big Data - that isn't what Dyson said. But like with Einstein quotes about bees, in a Google world, where accuracy is measured by how often you are repeated and thus make it to the top of search engines, the Big Data problem is accuracy, not volume.

Young women who post sexy or revealing photos on social media sites are regarded by female peers as less competent to perform tasks, less physically attractive and less socially attractive, a new study indicates.

"This is a clear indictment of sexy social media photos," said researcher Elizabeth Daniels, an assistant professor of psychology Oregon State University and co-author of the paper. Daniels' findings are based on an experiment she conducted using a fictitious Facebook profile. "There is so much pressure on teen girls and young women to portray themselves as sexy, but sharing those sexy photos online may have more negative consequences than positive."


Researchers have evaluated the safety and reliability of the existing targeted gene correction technologies, and successfully developed a new method, TALEN-HDAdV, which could significantly increased gene-correction efficiency in human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC). 

The combination of stem cells and targeted genome editing technology provides a powerful tool to model human diseases and develop potential cell replacement therapy. Although the utility of genome editing has been extensively documented, but the impact of these technologies on mutational load at the whole-genome level remains unclear.