Humor


Good Needlwork magazine shows you how to get better bosoms. Image: Dave Whatt

By Jo Brewis, University of Leicester

When my good friend and long-term collaborator Sam Warren was given a pile of women’s magazines from the 1930s by her grandmother Jane Frampton, we found among them 11 Christmas issues of Good Needlework, Model Housekeeping, The Needlewoman and Stitchcraft.

Cambridge University Press website mislabels and Astronomy text as an Astrology text. 
I was looking for open access open source freely downloadable and good textbooks to use in my future Astronomy classes.  The City Colleges require a very good text, but the supply of it to students in a timely manner hasn't been reliable as of late.  Over half of students in the City Colleges did not get books they ordered until the midterm.  

So I saw a page about books printed by Cambridge and the Open University.  Links on that website were broken so I went to search for them and found this.
Play the video below to see how to solve the puzzle I posted last week:

The object actually appears as it is pictured. It is not an optical illusion. The image was not created using an “in camera” special effect (no special lighting, no filters other than the built-in infrared filter, no mirrors, or any other “in camera” special effect technique). The image has not been modified with digital photography editing software. The object was not taped, or glued, or otherwise fastened together. The object was created using a single piece of ordinary twenty pound bond computer printer paper and a pair of scissors. Are you able to solve the puzzle of how it was made?

The object actually appears as it is pictured. It is not an optical illusion. The image was not created using an “in camera” special effect (no special lighting, no filters other than the built-in infrared filter, no mirrors, or any other “in camera” special effect technique). The image has not been modified with digital photography editing software. The object was not taped, or glued, or otherwise fastened together. The object was created using a single piece of ordinary twenty pound bond computer printer paper and a pair of scissors. Are you able to solve the puzzle of how it was made?

Programmers may not be the guys with the best sense of humor around, but I found it quite entertaining to read a web page with a collection of source code comments arising a smile.

The one I liked the most is the following - not even a comment, but the way the guy called the object he instantiates:

Prof. Jean-Claude Bradley, a true open science pioneer, has passed away.

Many people worked with him, he was willing to challenge the status quo and that means a lot of people wanted to be around him - he was one of the earliest scientists to sign up to help Science 2.0 after this first component launched. I don't know how he heard of us, he was just in tune with the broad science community that way.
A Quantum of Political Entanglement

If you like your science laced with humour, or your politics laced with (almost) science, then you will enjoy reading this scientific analysis of a politician.

Friction, magnetism, relativity, quantum mechanics - all are covered in “The physics of Nigel Farage”.

Even the URL is worth a read - http://www.theguardian.com/science/brain-flapping/2014/may/07/physics-nigel-farage-.

The Hairy Ball Theorem  (HBT) was first postulated (and then proved) by Luitzen Egbertus Jan Brouwer in 1912. An informal statement of the theorem is that :

              “One cannot comb the hair on a coconut”.

It finally happened. One of the purple striped socks my daughter Lana had given me as a birthday present in Winnipeg a few years ago vanished at some stage while I was doing laundry in Los Angeles, after we gave a lecture at UCLA.