Humor

LAUGHTER IS CLOSELY RELATED TO FEAR, RESEARCHERS FIND

HONG KONG, March 2, 2015

The surest way to make someone laugh is to attack them, researchers said this week.

Humor is rooted in fear, and laughter is a type of screaming.

The widespread belief that surprise is the basic unit of joke delivery is wrong, according to entertainment researchers at the School of Design, Hong Kong Polytechnic University. Unpredictability is a common but OPTIONAL element of the process of making people laugh out loud, while the creation of emotional tension is far more significant.

Oh, yes.  I absolutely adore meeting with the media, it's my chance to give something back, don't you know, to give aspiring young journalists a paw up, as it were.  It's the least I can do.

I understand, dear.  Of course you feel that way.  I'm sure I would too, if I were in your shoes.  Sorry! I can't resist these little jokes.

Yes, I think we should.  What would you like to ask me?

Santa's so busy he has no time to play, capturing data at 1.25Gb/s, the NSA way. Shannon-Long/knowyourmeme

By Jesse Blum, University of Nottingham

After a year in which further details of national intelligence agencies' shadowy surveillance networks were laid bare, a fresh leak of documents reveals the obsessive surveillance that extends as far north as Lapland.

Santa’s Arctic Workshop (SAW) has deployed a multinational panopticon surveillance program, according to leaked documents being called “the Snowman Files”.


Good Needlwork magazine shows you how to get better bosoms. Image: Dave Whatt

By Jo Brewis, University of Leicester

When my good friend and long-term collaborator Sam Warren was given a pile of women’s magazines from the 1930s by her grandmother Jane Frampton, we found among them 11 Christmas issues of Good Needlework, Model Housekeeping, The Needlewoman and Stitchcraft.

Cambridge University Press website mislabels and Astronomy text as an Astrology text. 
I was looking for open access open source freely downloadable and good textbooks to use in my future Astronomy classes.  The City Colleges require a very good text, but the supply of it to students in a timely manner hasn't been reliable as of late.  Over half of students in the City Colleges did not get books they ordered until the midterm.  

So I saw a page about books printed by Cambridge and the Open University.  Links on that website were broken so I went to search for them and found this.
Play the video below to see how to solve the puzzle I posted last week:

The object actually appears as it is pictured. It is not an optical illusion. The image was not created using an “in camera” special effect (no special lighting, no filters other than the built-in infrared filter, no mirrors, or any other “in camera” special effect technique). The image has not been modified with digital photography editing software. The object was not taped, or glued, or otherwise fastened together. The object was created using a single piece of ordinary twenty pound bond computer printer paper and a pair of scissors. Are you able to solve the puzzle of how it was made?

The object actually appears as it is pictured. It is not an optical illusion. The image was not created using an “in camera” special effect (no special lighting, no filters other than the built-in infrared filter, no mirrors, or any other “in camera” special effect technique). The image has not been modified with digital photography editing software. The object was not taped, or glued, or otherwise fastened together. The object was created using a single piece of ordinary twenty pound bond computer printer paper and a pair of scissors. Are you able to solve the puzzle of how it was made?

Programmers may not be the guys with the best sense of humor around, but I found it quite entertaining to read a web page with a collection of source code comments arising a smile.

The one I liked the most is the following - not even a comment, but the way the guy called the object he instantiates:

Prof. Jean-Claude Bradley, a true open science pioneer, has passed away.

Many people worked with him, he was willing to challenge the status quo and that means a lot of people wanted to be around him - he was one of the earliest scientists to sign up to help Science 2.0 after this first component launched. I don't know how he heard of us, he was just in tune with the broad science community that way.