Outdated Science And Alarmism Drives Flame...
Professor Frenkel: Why Shouldn't We Drop Algebra...
Laughter’s Evolutionary Past
New Physics In The Angular Distribution Of...
Keeping Fruit Fresh Without Refrigeration - Using Silk
Thanks to science and technology, food is no longer a luxury, it is a commodity. If anti-science groups spent less time scaring uneducated people and more time caring about humanity, there would be enough food to feed 10 billion people right now, just by reducing food waste.Right now, almost 50 ...
By News Staff
1,000 Times Faster Than Ever Before
Photosynthesis, vision, and many other biological processes depend on light, but it’s hard to capture responses of biomolecules to light because they happen almost instantaneously.Recently, scholars were able to capture snapshots of these ultrafast reactions in a bacterial light sensor using ...
By News Staff
Hazard Categorization Of Chemicals: Different Tools Provide Different Results
This month, the International Agency for Research on Cancer will issue another paper suggesting a chemical causes cancer - probably one of the compounds in coffee - and journalists will read what IARC actually claims about calculating risk and assume IARC calculates risk. Then, after blowback from ...
By News Staff
Unique Fragment From Earth’s Formation Returns Home
Unlike most asteroids, C/2014 S3 (PANSTARRS) was formed in the inner Solar System at the same time as the Earth itself, but was ejected at a very early stage and has not been baked by billions of years near the Sun. Instead, it has been preserved in the best freezer there is: the Oort Cloud, a ...
By News Staff
How Nature Is Eroding Coral Reefs
Coral reefs and hard-shelled sea creatures such as oysters and mussels are constantly being threatened, not only by the detrimental effects of stressors such as climate change and habitat loss, but also by microorganisms. Researchers have discovered how a particular type of cyanobacteria, a photosynthetic ...
By News Staff
Groundwater Overstated In Sea Level Rise
Groundwater extraction and other land water contribute about three times less to sea level rise than previous estimates, according to a new study. Sea level has risen an estimated average 1.7 mm per year over the 20th and the early 21st century, and concerns are that will increase uif climate change ...
By News Staff
Exodus 2100: Due To Climate Change
More than 500 million people live in the Middle East and North Africa, which has always been hot in summer. And it's getting hotter, says Jos Lelieveld, Director at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry and Professor at the Cyprus Institute. The number of extremely hot days has doubled since 1970 ...
By News Staff
How Nature Disrupts Coral Reefs' Recycling
Coral reefs, the world's most productive and diverse marine ecosystems, rely on a recycling program to stay healthy: The corals and algae that form the base of the reef's food web release a variety of nutrients that support a complex and efficient food chain. But when this system gets out of whack ...
By News Staff
Pregnancy Reenvisioned As A Conflict-Driven Battle Between Mother And Child
Pregnancy sounds like the ultimate form of animal cooperation – mothers share their own bodies to grow and support their children’s prenatal development. But in reality, embryos use every trick in the book to take more than their fair share. Mothers, in turn, marshal their best defensive tactics ...
By The Conversation
#VultureLivesMatter
Vultures are often cartoon-ish characters in parched deserts. No one wants them around because in western films it means they are just waiting for you to die. Cultural jokes aside, vultures in some parts of the world are in danger of disappearing. And according to a new report from University ...
By News Staff
Sorry Galileo, Coastal Birds Use Tides And Moon Phases
Galileo is regarded as an important figure today, because he was put under house arrest by his church for ridiculing the Pope, but for much of his career he was derided by other scientists. Both Kepler and mathematics knew Galileo was wrong about the moon, for example, but his flavor of science ...
By News Staff
Scientists Discover Oral Sex In Spiders
Madagascan Darwin's bark spider (Caerostris darwini) are a sexually size dimorphic species from Madagascar, with females several times larger and heavier than males. If you want a weird science project for school, kids, these are the way to go. C. darwini has a rich sexual repertoire that not only ...
By News Staff
Is Meat Killing Us? Meta-Analysis By Osteopaths Says Yes
A review of six studies that evaluated the effects of meat and vegetarian diets on mortality involving more than 1.5 million people concluded all-cause mortality is higher for those who eat meat, particularly red or processed meat, on a daily basis. The work by physicians from Mayo Clinic in Arizona ...
By News Staff
Women More Likely To Be Over-Prescribed Prescription Drugs, And Elderly Women Most Of All
Nearly one in three British Columbia women over age 65 received inappropriate levels of prescription medicines in 2013, while only one in four men of the same age did, according to a new paper. The work analyzed population-based health-care datasets to find out which medical and non-medical factors ...
By News Staff
New Hampshire Infants Who Ate Rice Had Higher Urinary Concentrations Of Arsenic
Rice and rice products are typical first foods for infants in some countries and a new study found that infants who ate rice and rice products had higher urinary arsenic concentrations than those who did not consume any type of rice. Infant rice cereal may contain inorganic arsenic concentrations ...
By News Staff
High Doses Of Common Chemo Drug Methotrexate Limit Relapses Of Childhood Leukemia
With a cure rate approaching 90 percent, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common type of childhood cancer, is one of the big "success stories" of modern cancer treatment. Yet up to 20 percent of patients with a high risk of relapse are not cured, which could change with the results ...
By News Staff
Balance Schmalance: Combining Home And Work Life Can Be Better
London, UK (May 04, 2016). Leaving work at the office and home at the door may not always be the best strategy for employee well-being and performance, according to a new paper in Human Relations . Traditionally it has been thought that in order to maintain concentration and high performance, ...
By News Staff
Younger Gay And Bisexual Men 6X More Likely To Attempt Suicide
Young gay and bisexual men under the age of 26 are six times more likely to attempt suicide or self-harm compared to men in that group aged over 45, and twice as likely to be depressed or anxious, according to a paper in the Journal of Public Health. Using data from the Stonewall Gay and Bisexual ...
By News Staff
Why Does Anyone Still Believe In The Loch Ness Monster?
People are fascinated by the unknown, by the possibility that there are things out there that are yet to be discovered.We think that most of our planet has been mapped by satellites and continents have been thoroughly explored. Although scientists estimate that millions of species are yet to be ...
By The Conversation
For The Indiana Jones In You: How To Find Lost Treasure
A lost Nazi gold train was discovered in Poland. At least, that’s what a couple of treasure hunters told the world last year. Like all lost treasures, the search for this one had been going on for many years, usually without success. But many still believe in these far-fetched yarns and some ...
By The Conversation
How To Make Women's Tennis More Competitive
While women's tennis is arguably far more interesting than the men's game, there are some who want to make it more like the male version, or at least more competitive between women.In a Journal of Sports Economics paper, the authors examined the differences between men's and women's tournament ...
By News Staff
Contemporary Polymath: How The Renaissance Man Is Making A Comeback
As anyone who has visited the London Science Museum’s current exhibition will know, Leonardo da Vinci is famed as an artist, mathematician, inventor, writer … the list goes on. He was a figure who did not see disciplines as a checkerboard of independent black and white tiles, but a vibrant ...
By The Conversation
World's Tiniest Thermometer Made Of DNA
Researchers have created a programmable DNA thermometer that 20,000 times smaller than a human hair, using a discovery made 60 years ago - that DNA molecules that encode our genetic information can unfold when heated. "In recent years, biochemists also discovered that biomolecules such as ...
By News Staff
Donald Trump Could Change Journalism For The Better - By Removing Its Pretense Of Objectivity
It is unsurprising that wherever Donald Trump goes, headlines follow. But what is particularly interesting is just how many of those headlines involve the practice of journalism and journalists themselves.Trump has called to “open up” libel laws. He has mocked New York Times reporter Serge ...
By The Conversation
On the 23rd of April, Barack Obama, President of the United States of America (fanfare!) issued...  more »
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Patients with lower literacy levels in search for health information may gravitate toward websites...  more »
I think this might be interesting to the few of you left out there who still read paper books (I...  more »
I gave a 15 minute talk at a local Americal Physical Society Meeting.  Here is the title and...  more »