Science Education & Policy

Solar energy, with tens of billions in subsidies to keep it afloat, now employs more people than the fossil fuel alternative it is irrationally pitted against in media - coal. 

Solar panels are fine for elites, just like organic food is - but like with organic food we shouldn't manipulate data to match our belief system.

When did it become okay for the media to be anti-science and anti-agriculture?

The IARC monograph program on Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks must be reformed and brought into the 21st century – or it should be abolished

The World Health Organisation’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) monograph program is an outmoded cancer classification scheme that has remained fundamentally unchanged since the monograph program was established in the early 1970s. In the intervening 45 years, scientific understanding of cancer causation has deepened and provided decision makers with an evolving appreciation of how effects seen in laboratory animals should be used to protect human health.

This  post is intended for general chemistry class activity.  The concepts review is written for the readers to  comment, point out misconceptions and make suggestions for improvement.

Concepts Review

The time of year for standardized state testing has arrived and if you have school-age children, there’s no way to avoid this topic. Everyone has strong opinions when it comes to the issue of “opting out,” so how do you decide what’s best for your child?
 
To help you make the best decision for your child, let me debunk some common parental concerns when it comes to opting out:

Will opting out spoil my child or teach them to avoid responsibility?

President Trump says he came to Washington to “drain the swamp,” and now his administration is looking for wasteful programs to cut. A great start would be pulling the plug on numerous federal “research” programs that, frankly, have been captured by Washington special interests.

In fact, much of taxpayer-funded research serves ideological agendas—especially environmental activism—at the expensive of legitimate scientific inquiry. Consider a few examples.

Last December I took on a new challenge.  I was asked to speak to a large Canadian audience of agricultural producers about climate change.  ‘Bout time I stepped into a controversial area.  I’m used to getting hassles and public records requests from lefty food activists that think my acceptance of scientific consensus in genetic engineering is dictated by multinational corporations. Now I can get hassles and FOIA requests from the multinational corporations that think my acceptance of scientific consensus in climate is dictated by lefty food activists. Good times.

Technology development and use is one of the distinguishing human characteristics.

The latest performance tables for secondary and primary schools in England have been released – with parents and educators alike looking to the tables to understand and compare schools in their area.

Schools will also be keen to see if they have met a new set of national standards set by the government. These new standards now include “progress” measures, which are a type of “value-added measure”. These compare pupils’ results with other pupils who got the same exam scores as them at the end of primary school.

Why Science is Worth Studying.

Excerpts from a very good book -

Rustic sounds and other studies in literature and natural history
by Sir Francis Darwin,  1917

I found this book by Sir Francis Darwin to be both an absorbing and easy read.  Good science combines well with light humour, and Sir Francis Darwin achieves this combination in a masterly fashion.

The reference to 'boys' reflects the times of Sir Francis Darwin: it should now be read as 'boys and girls', of course.

I think that we all, who study science, hope to be the first to discover some exciting new fact -