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    Online
    Joined: Mar 1 2013
    Here again is the link to the SPARK press release: https://www.societyforscience.org/press-release-spark-competition

    This is the video presentation:

     http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZtWNXmAUIfg


    My initial thought on the kit is that it should be open source, that is, instructions for experiments be made available to the public here on Science 2.0 and/or at Figshare.


    Here's a sample I published on Figshare:


    http://figshare.com/articles/Do_It_Yourself_Alcohol_Lamp/827260


    Homeschooling parents, teachers, etc. can choose between scrounging the parts on their own or purchasing a kit.

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    Online
    Joined: Oct 28 2006
    I'm going to be first in line to buy your book.
    Online
    Joined: Mar 1 2013
    That's funny. I don't have a publisher. I thought about the problem over the weekend and realized that there's only 11 weeks until the deadline. I can only produce about one article per week. That would be a chemistry set with 11 experiments. BOO! So, what I've decided to do is just post up my ideas for the set and whoever wants can take them or leave them.

    I found this kit at Salvation army for $1.00 USD:

    http://www.thamesandkosmos.com/products/dbfbcc/dbfbcc.html


    What is sad is that all the parts were still in the kit--it doesn't look like it was ever played with. I found this same kit on the shelves at Barnes and noble over the weekend. Retail cost $36.00. Also on the shelves were the Thames and Kosmos Chem c1000 retail cost $64.00 to get an idea of what sets are already out there: 

    http://www.thamesandkosmos.com/products/chem/chemc1000.html

    Online
    Joined: Oct 28 2006
    Well, you have to do an outline and then two sample chapters, get an agent, then he'll find the publisher. 

    Neat about the used kit; some parent trying to create interest in a kid. When I was young, my family got my brother a small computer, a T/S 1000, despite the fact that he had zero interest in it. He waited about a month to torture me, and then finally gave it to me.
    Online
    Joined: Mar 1 2013
    Don't have an agent either.
    Online
    Joined: Mar 1 2013
    I'm taking the SPARK official rules literally:

    Projects may involve any scientific or engineering discipline.

    a. Eligible projects are ideas that engage children as young as 8 and inspire people who are 88. The project should encourage exploring, building and questioning.

    Here's a design for a bunsen burner stand made from erector set pieces that can be included in the kit (still needs a bit of work):

    In the Dangerous Book for Boys kit, the test tube rack is made of cardboard but I've got a design for test tube rack built out of another construction toy. I'll try to post it up as an article this week.

    Online
    Joined: Mar 1 2013
    If anyone out there is seriously considering developing a SPARK kit (yes "kit" is redundant: Science Play and Research Kit kit), I'm trying to think of what you can do for inspiration.

    My first thought is: play a round of golf (or engage in some other social activity) with...wait for it...public school teachers.

    (To gain some insight into the challenges these brave souls face)

    Online
    Joined: Mar 1 2013
    Next watch this video by Gever Tulley: 

    http://blog.ted.com/2007/12/21/gever_tulley_on/

    (sorry, can't embed the video).

    Online
    Joined: Mar 1 2013
    ...and here's another TED video by Dr. Tae, the skateboarding physicist, titled "Can Skateboarding Save Our Schools?"

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