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Bumble Bee Studies Show How Science Can Be Massaged

Two recent studies on the health of bumblebees and links to neonicotinoids were published simultaneously...

Getting Risk Right: Geoffrey Kabat's Guide To Resisting Health Scares

Type “BPA” and “toxic” into Google and you get more than 500,000 results, many detailing...

Ideology Of Climate Change: How Activist Journalism At Columbia Led To A Partisan Lawsuit

The court case over whether ExxonMobil may have deliberately downplayed the potential dangers of...

When It Comes To Bees, NYT Has A Fake News Blindspot

The line between deliberately manipulating a story and poorly reporting the facts is perilously...

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Jon EntineRSS Feed of this column.

Jon Entine is the founding director of the independent foundation funded Genetic Literacy Project. He is a senior fellow at the World Food Center Institute for Food and Agricultural Literacy at the... Read More »

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Jonathan Lundgren, a US Department of Agriculture currently on leave facing misconduct charges, says the government is suppressing information about the dangers of pesticides, which he believes are endangering the health of bees around the world.

"We can think of scientific knowledge as a consensus of experts."
--Naomi Oreskes

"There is a tendency among public intellectuals who are entirely reasonable in some areas to descend into the promotion of pseudoscience in others.
--Debunking Denialism, on Oreskes

Like the fictional parents in the edgy comedy show South Park who blame Canada for all of their woes, environmentalists often coalesce around

Chipotle wins the science ‘foot in mouth’ award for 2015, and we are not even to summer yet. So far there are more than 40 media condemnations and counting.

The fast food chain’s “bold” move, announcing a faux ban on GMOs in its food, has blown up big time. Why faux? Because, as Chipotle well knows, its sodas, beef, pork and chicken dishes, and any food with cheese, are made with ingredients that were derived through genetic engineering.

Last week, in Part I of this two part series, "Bee Deaths Mystery Solved?

Reports that honey bees are dying in unusually high numbers has concerned many scientists, farmers and beekeepers, and  gripped the public. There have been thousands of stories ricocheting across the web, citing one study or another as the definitive explanation for a mystery that most mainstream experts say is complex and not easily reducible to the kind of simplistic narrative that appeals to advocacy groups.

This is part one of a two-part series that will examine this phenomenon: how complex science is reduced to ideology, how scientists and journalists often facilitate that--and its problematic impact on public policy, the environment and in this case the wondrous honey bee.