Sports Science

For years, sport science and motor control research has added support to the fundamental assertions that "practice makes perfect" and "repetition is the mother of habit".  Shooting 100 free throws, kicking 100 balls on goal or fielding 100 ground balls must certainly build the type of motor programs in the brain that will only help make the 101st play during the game.  K. Anders Ericsson, the "expert on experts", has defined the minimum amount of "deliberate practice" necessary to raise any novice to the level of expert as 10 years or 10,000 hours.

Listen to science instead of Tiger Woods on golf? Sheer madness.

But golfers who heed the advice of instructors to keep their heads perfectly still while putting may be hampering their game, according to a study in the July issue of the Journal of Motor Behavior that examined coordination patterns.

Tim Lee, professor of kinesiology at McMaster University and a golfer himself, says the findings run contrary to conventional wisdom, or at least conventional golf wisdom.
 

The putting stroke is used more frequently than any other during a round of golf, regardless of skill. In 2007, putts represented 41.3 per cent of total strokes taken by members of the PGA tour, and 40 percent for members of the LPGA.

Like birds of a feather bikers in a peloton stick together. The formation used by competitive bikers, especially in the Tour De France, has to do with energy conservation and courtesy.

Peloton is a French word meaning “rolled up ball.” In English it is referred to as a “platoon.” It is crucial for cyclists who are expending a lot of energy for a significant amount of time to take advantage of this pack.

In the 2003 book “High-Tech Cycling” by Edmund R. Burke, he talks about the peloton as a huge source of energy in some cases reducing drag against wind up to 40 percent.

Like birds of a feather bikers in a peloton stick together. The formation used by competitive bikers, especially in the Tour De France, has to do with energy conservation and courtesy.

Peloton is a French word meaning “rolled up ball.” In English it is referred to as a “platoon.” It is crucial for cyclists who are expending a lot of energy for a significant amount of time to take advantage of this pack.

In the 2003 book “High-Tech Cycling” by Edmund R. Burke, he talks about the peloton as a huge source of energy in some cases reducing drag against wind up to 40 percent.

LONDON, December 19 /PRNewswire/ -- Now that the first snows have come across Europe and the US, skiers will be tempted to rush out and get some action on the piste.

That's just the moment accidents can happen, warns Greg Lawson, Group Broking Director of online travel insurance company Flexicover.Net, as he offers some timely advice to help skiers stay safe on the slopes.

"Winter sports can be dangerous but there are all sorts of things skiers and snowboarders can do to make sure they have a fun and safe holiday in the snow," he says. These are: