Edward O. Wilson’s New Theory of Everything
    By Hank Campbell | October 17th 2011 10:09 AM | 3 comments | Print | E-mail | Track Comments
    Edward O. Wilson is arguably the world's most famous myrmecologist - he studies ants, but most people have not heard of myrmecology.  They may have heard of entomology and almost certainly have heard of evolutionary biology.

    Wilson has long held that his study of ants can tell us about people and that hasn't been without controversy.  His acrimony with paleontologist Stephen Jay Gould, who likewise extrapolated his knowledge into the social working of mankind, never ended, even after Gould died.

    At 82, he is not slowing down, and he is currently trying to study (and save) a patch of wilderness and continue to puncture some holes in kin selection and inclusive fitness and his more recent work has gotten him attacked by lots and lots of younger scientists attached to a particular mindset (and Richard Dawkins, attached to his own) but he perseveres in his quest for answers despite what co-discoverer of the DNA double helix Dr. James Watson called attacks by 'unpleasant leftists.'

    Read his latest adventures at E. O. Wilson’s Theory of Everything by Howard French, The Atlantic

    And below, see a picture of Wilson with a bear, not an ant, at his 80th birthday celebration - our mascot Bloggy.


    Comments

    Is there any scientific way to sterilize ants or control their populations in a humane way?

    Gerhard Adam
    No
    Mundus vult decipi
    Gerhard Adam
    Wilson is the one guy that could finally challenge Kin selection and selfish gene theory.  It's about time, that we dispense with the rhetorical nonsense and began to examine how social groups, cooperative, and altruism are actually manifest.

    Unfortunately, even the latest from Pinker, demonstrates that "they" just don't get it, by making simplistic comparisons between groups and individuals, it really illustrates the deep level of misunderstanding that exists regarding natural selection.
    Mundus vult decipi