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    98 Year Old Drug Suramin Reverses Autism-Like Symptoms In Mice
    By News Staff | June 18th 2014 08:53 AM | 2 comments | Print | E-mail | Track Comments

    In the many hypotheses surrounding autism, one posits it is the consequence of abnormal cell communication.

    Researchers at the U.C. San Diego recently did a study using a drug from 1916, suramin, which was approved for treating sleeping sickness. The findings in Translational Psychiatry were that it
    restored normal cellular signaling in a mouse model of autism, reversing symptoms of the neurological disorder in animals that were the human biological age equivalent of 30 years old. 

    Robert K. Naviaux, MD, PhD, said one of the universal symptoms of autism is metabolic disturbances. "Cells have a halo of metabolites (small molecules involved in metabolism, the set of chemical processes that maintain life) and nucleotides surrounding them. These create a sort of chemical glow that broadcasts the state of health of the cell."

    Cells threatened or damaged by microbes, such as viruses or bacteria, or by physical forces or by chemicals, such as pollutants, react defensively, a part of the normal immune response, Naviaux said. Their membranes stiffen. Internal metabolic processes are altered, most notably mitochondria – the cells' critical "power plants.




    Transmission electron micrograph of a cell mitochondrion. Credit: Thomas Deerinck, NCMIR, UC San Diego.

     "And communications between cells are dramatically reduced. This is the "cell danger response," said Naviaux, and if it persists, the result can be lasting, diverse impairment. If it occurs during childhood, for example, neurodevelopment is delayed. 

    "Cells behave like countries at war," said Naviaux. "When a threat begins, they harden their borders. They don't trust their neighbors. But without constant communication with the outside, cells begin to function differently. In the case of neurons, it might be by making fewer or too many connections. One way to look at this related to autism is this: When cells stop talking to each other, children stop talking."

    Naviaux and colleagues have focused on a cellular signaling system linked to both mitochondrial function and to the cell's innate immune function. Specifically, they have zeroed in on the role of nucleotides like adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and other signaling mitokines – molecules generated by distressed mitochondria. These mitokines have separate metabolic functions outside of the cell where they bind to and regulate receptors present on every cell of the body. Nineteen types of so-called purinergic receptors are known to be stimulated by these extracellular nucleotides, and the receptors are known to control a broad range of biological characteristics with relevance to autism, such as impaired language and social skills.

    In their latest work, Naviaux again tested the effect of suramin, a well-known inhibitor of purinergic signaling that was first synthesized in 1916 and is used to treat trypanosomiasis or African sleeping sickness, a parasitic disease. They found that suramin blocked the extracellular signaling pathway used by ATP and other mitokines in a mouse model of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), ending the cell danger response and related inflammation. Cells subsequently began behaving normally and autism-like behaviors and metabolism in the mice were corrected.

    However, the biological and behavioral benefits of suramin were not permanent, nor preventive. A single dose remained effective in the mice for about five weeks, and then washed out. Moreover, suramin cannot be taken long-term since it can result in anemia and adrenal gland dysfunction.

    Still, Naviaux said these and earlier findings are sufficiently encouraging to soon launch a small phase 1 clinical trial with children who have ASD. He expects the trial to begin later this year.

    "Obviously correcting abnormalities in a mouse is a long way from a cure in humans, but we think this approach – antipurinergic therapy – is a new and fresh way to think about and address the challenge of autism.

    "Our work doesn't contradict what others have discovered or done. It's another perspective. Our idea is that this kind of treatment – eliminating a basic, underlying metabolic dysfunction – removes a hurdle that might make other non-drug behavioral and developmental therapies of autism more effective. The discovery that a single dose of medicine can fundamentally reset metabolism for weeks means that newer and safer drugs might not need to be given chronically. Members of this new class of medicines might need to be given only intermittently during sensitive developmental windows to unblock metabolism and permit improved development in response to many kinds of behavioral and occupational therapies, and to natural play."




    Comments

    This is a fascinating article,to think that every cell of our body has a relationship with it's environment i.e.other cells[social]pollutants microbes,bacteria etc.and surely this must lead us to wonder whether we as people also are effected by our environment in the same way and as societies are effected by ecological environment.As Einstein said everything rests on relationships and how we interrelate .It's good to see how scientists are beginning to interrelate here on science2.0 as well as internationally.Don't harden your scientific borders,scientists,or perhaps you need a dose of suramin too never miss the chance to cross pollinate your ideas with other scientists.

    This is a fascinating article,to think that every cell of our body has a relationship with it's environment i.e.other cells[social]pollutants microbes,bacteria etc.and surely this must lead us to wonder whether we as people also are effected by our environment in the same way and as societies are effected by ecological environment.As Einstein said everything rests on relationships and how we interrelate .It's good to see how scientists are beginning to interrelate here on science2.0 as well as internationally.Don't harden your scientific borders,scientists,or perhaps you need a dose of suramin too never miss the chance to cross pollinate your ideas with other scientists.