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    Poor Public Understanding Of Bladder Cancer
    By News Staff | September 28th 2012 01:30 PM | Print | E-mail | Track Comments

    Entertainer Andy Williams died this week  following his year-long battle with bladder cancer. Over 10,000 people are diagnosed with bladder cancer every year in the UK but recent research from Action Bladder Cancer showed that one quarter (25%) of UK men and women wouldn't know what a sign of possible bladder cancer might be. 

     "Bladder cancer is the 4th most common cancer in men and the 11th most common in women in the UK[1]," commented Dr Alison Birtle, Consultant Clinical Oncologist, Rosemere Cancer Centre, Preston, Lancashire and Trustee of Action on Bladder Cancer. "We don't know the details of Andy Williams' condition throughout his battle against the disease, but improved awareness of bladder cancer in the UK is vitally important. Over the last 15-20 years bladder cancer has been in the shadows. ABC is the only UK charity dedicated to improving awareness and understanding of bladder cancer and promoting more research into the illness. 

    ABC's research showed that half of the people questioned have no idea what causes bladder cancer. One in five people think it is caused by drinking too much alcohol, but did not realise the close link between bladder cancer and smoking.

     "We don't expect everyone to be an expert, but such a huge lack of understanding can lead to people being misdiagnosed and/or diagnosed at a later stage in the disease which can narrow down the best treatment choices," continued Birtle. 

    References:

    1) Cancer Research UK, Cancer Stats Key Facts, Bladder Cancer http://info.cancerresearchuk.org/prod_consump/groups/cr_common/@nre/@sta... .

    2) GfK NOP Survey on bladder cancer for Action on Bladder Cancer, April 2012

    Survey Technical Details:

     GfK NOP conducted a nationally representative face-to-face omnibus survey amongst 2055 adults aged 16+ in 2010. In 2012 Gfk NOP commissioned TNS Research to conduct a face-to-face omnibus survey amongst 1015 adults aged 16+ in Great Britain. Weighting was applied to the data in both surveys to ensure it matched known population profiles.