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    Purdue Students Create Soy-Based, Renewable, Recyclable Filament For 3-D Printing
    By News Staff | April 4th 2014 09:05 PM | Print | E-mail | Track Comments
    The top prize in the annual Purdue Student Soybean Product Innovation Contest went to Carmen Valverde-Paniagua of Chihuahua, Mexico, a senior majoring in mechanical engineering, Nicole Raley Devlin of Rockville, Md., a doctoral student in chemical engineering, and Yanssen Tandy of Jarkarta, Indonesia, a senior student in chemical engineering (team name S3D Innovations) for their invention of Filasoy, a next generation 3D printing material. 

    Filasoy replaces petroleum-based plastic with a low-energy, low-temperature, renewable and recyclable filament. It retains similar properties found in a bioplastic with an added "green" twist: It allows printing without waste. The team will receive a $20,000 prize.

    The runner-up team, Soots, produced a 100 percent organic leather boot conditioner and polish by the same name. The product comes in two forms: One, made from soybean oil and beeswax, is a thick, more solid polish for genuine leather such as boots and reins and also serves as a waterproofing agent.


    From left, ISA President David Lowe presents a check to Team Filasoy members Nicole Raley, Yanssen Tandy and Carmen Valverde-Paniagua. Credit: Indiana Soybean Alliance

    The product is safe for the environment and not harmful to animals. The second product is a much lighter conditioner, in the form of a spray, that can be used on faux leather items. It is used more for cleaning and improving appearance than waterproofing.

    The team will receive a $10,000 prize. Members are Sean Anderson of Churubusco, Ind., a junior in forestry; his brother, Evan, a sophomore in agricultural engineering; and Sara Richert of Oak Park, Ill., a sophomore in agricultural engineering.