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What's Happening With Your Donated Blood And Tissue Sample? Do You Care?

When donating blood, plasma, human tissue or any other bodily sample for medical research, most...

Corn Co-products From Wet Milling Fine For Pig Diets

Many co-products from the corn processing industry may be used in diets fed to pigs. Much attention...

Pain From Shots Shows Up In Infant Brain Activity Too

It's no surprise that pain shows up in brain scans but a new study finds distinct, consistent patterns...

Bitcoin Scams Steal $11 Million

Bitcoin is the digital world's most popular "virtual currency", with millions in circulation. Fraudulent...

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Our DNA determines a lot about who we are and how we play with others, but recent studies of social animals (birds and bees, among others) show that the interaction between genes and behavior is more of a two-way street than many of us realize.  It's not a new idea but the new studies give it more credibility, says  University of Illinois entomology and neuroscience professor Gene Robinson, lead author of a review on the subject this week in Science. Stanford University biology professor Russell Fernald and Illinois cell and developmental biology and neuroscience professor David Clayton are co-authors.
Scientists say that a type of rock found at or near the surface in the Mideast nation of Oman and other areas around the world could be harnessed to soak up huge quantities of globe-warming carbon dioxide. Their studies show that the rock, known as peridotite, reacts naturally at surprisingly high rates with CO2 to form solid minerals—and that the process could be speeded a million times or more with simple drilling and injection methods.
The earliest known Hebrew text written in a Proto-Canaanite script has been discovered by Hebrew University archaeologists in an ancient city in the area where David slew Goliath – the earliest Judean city found to date. The 3,000 year old finding is thought to be the most significant archaeological discovery in Israel since the Dead Sea Scrolls – predating them by 1,000 years. 

The ostracon (pottery shard inscribed with writing in ink) comprises five lines of text divided by black lines and measures 15 x 15 cm. and was found at excavations of a 10th century B.C.E. fortress - the oldest known Judaic city. 

The ostracon was found lying on the floor inside a building near the city gate of the site, known as the Elah Fortress at Khirbet Qeiyafa. 
NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer has lifted the veil off a ghost known to haunt the local universe, providing new insight into the formation and evolution of galaxies. 

The eerie creature, called NGC 404, is a type of galaxy known as "lenticular." Lenticular galaxies are disk-shaped, with little ongoing star formation and no spiral arms. NGC 404 is the nearest example of a lenticular galaxy, and therefore of great interest. But it lies hidden in the glare from a red giant star called Mirach. For this reason, NGC 404 became known to astronomers as the "Ghost of Mirach." 

When the Galaxy Evolution Explorer spied the galaxy in ultraviolet light, a spooky ring materialized. 

Researchers have carried out the largest study of differences between human and chimpanzee genomes, identifying regions that have been duplicated or lost during evolution of the two lineages. The study, published in Genome Research, is the first to compare many human and chimpanzee genomes in the same fashion.

The team show that particular types of genes - such as those involved in the inflammatory response and in control of cell proliferation - are more commonly involved in gain or loss. They also provide new evidence for a gene that has been associated with susceptibility to infection by HIV.
Three million Americans suffer from stuttering.  It afflicts  5% of all children and most eventually overcome it but childhood suffering from stuttering can be traumatic, producing educational, social, and occupational disadvantages.   Bruce Willis, Marilyn Monroe and Carly Simon all suffered from stuttering  as children and it can affect children of all ages but boys are three times more likely to stutter than girls.