Tomorrow at 2PM two back-to-back talks by Jim Olsen and Marumi Kado at CERN will disclose the newest results of the CMS and ATLAS experiments, which will be based on the analysis of 2.5 to 4 inverse femtobarns of 13 TeV proton-proton collisions acquired by the experiments this year.
Why should you be interested ? Of course, because the year could end with a boom! Maybe the experiments have found evidence for something totally unexpected in their data. After all, 13 TeV is 63% more energy than 8 TeV. 
When we look out at the universe – even with the most powerful of telescopes – we can only see a fraction of the matter we know must be there. In fact, for every gram’s worth of atoms in the universe, there is at least five times more invisible material called “dark matter”. So far scientists have failed to detect it, despite spending decades searching.

The reason we know it exists is because of the gravitational pull of galaxy clusters and other phenomena we observe.

In this blog, I challenge the vaulted role that tensor calculus enjoys today. I will define a concrete example of what I consider to be a technical flaw in the tools of tensor calculus in all modern physics theories. The complaint is about completeness, that partial stories are not good enough. Please feel free to defend the status quo in the comments.

The relativistic quantum field equation for a spin 0 particle is the Klein-Gordon equation (written in natural units):

One takes the first derivative of the wave function. Also take three spatial derivatives. Then take the second time derivative of the wave function, and similarly for the three spatial derivatives.


Dec 10 2015 | 1 comment(s)

As I am sure happens with many other human occupations, the job of a particle physicist proceeds in bursts of activity interspersed with periods of more relative calm. Deadlines must be met, and sometimes several of them overlap. The life of a physicist can get miserable for short periods of time, but after those end one usually looks back with satisfaction at the accomplishments.
This week's graph is a reminder that particle physicists are, deep in their bones, bump hunters. Sure, some of my colleagues could best be described as detector builders; others as software wizards; still others as statistical gurus. But what excites us the most is to go hunting for a bump in a mass histogram. 

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been colliding protons at record high energy since the summer, but now the time has now come to collide large nuclei (nuclei of lead, Pb, consist of 208 neutrons and protons).

Have you recently obtained a Masters degree in a scientific discipline ? Are you fascinated by particle physics ? Do you have an interest in Machine Learning developments, artificial intelligence, and all that ? Or are you just well versed in Statistical Analysis ? Do you want to be paid twice as much as I am for attending a PhD ? If the above applies to you, you are certainly advised to read on. 
As an editor of the new Elsevier journal "Reviews in Physics" I am quite proud to see that the first submissions of review articles are reaching publication stage. Four such articles are going to be published in the course of the next couple of months, and more are due shortly thereafter. 
While in the process of fact-checking information that is contained in the book I am finalizing, I had the pleasure to have a short discussion with Gordon Kane during the weekend. A Victor Weisskopf distinguished professor at the University of Michigan as well as a director emeritus of the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, Gordon is one of the fathers of Supersymmetry, and has devoted the last three decades to its study.
I was very happy today to sign a contract with an international publisher that will publish a book I have written. The book, titled "Anomaly! - Scientific Discoveries and the Quest for the Unknown", focuses on the CDF experiment, a particle detector that operated at the Tevatron collider for 30 years. 
The Tevatron was the highest-energy collider until the turn-on of the LHC. The CDF and DZERO experiments there discovered the sixth quark, the top, and produced a large number of world-class results in particle physics.