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    Fish-Tetrapod Transition Got A New Hypothesis In 2011
    By News Staff | December 27th 2011 06:53 PM | 1 comment | Print | E-mail | Track Comments
    The late Devonian, about 390 million years ago to roughly 360 million years ago, was a time of struggle and escape for fish in a drying environment, theorized paleontologist Alfred Romer.  That circumstances and necessity for continued survival were vital in fish-tetrapod transition.

    The imagery of such a drastic adaptation to changing environmental conditions may be evolving into a new picture, according to Gregory J. Retallack, professor of geological sciences at the University of Oregon. He says that his discoveries at numerous sites in Maryland, New York and Pennsylvania suggests that "such a plucky hypothetical ancestor of ours probably could not have survived the overwhelming odds of perishing in a trek to another shrinking pond."

    Retallack argues for a different explanation. He examined numerous buried soils in rocks yielding footprints and bones of early transitional fossils between fish and amphibians of Devonian and Carboniferous geological age and claims what he found raises a major challenge to Romer's theory.

    "These transitional fossils were not associated with drying ponds or deserts, but consistently were found with humid woodland soils," he said. "Remains of drying ponds and desert soils also are known and are littered with fossil fish, but none of our distant ancestors. Judging from where their fossils were found, transitional forms between fish and amphibians lived in wooded floodplains. Our distant ancestors were not so much foolhardy, as opportunistic, taking advantage of floodplains and lakes choked with roots and logs for the first time in geological history."

    Limbs proved handy for negotiating woody obstacles, and flexible necks allowed for feeding in shallow water, Retallack said. By this new woodland hypothesis, the limbs and necks, which distinguish salamanders from fish, did not arise from reckless adventure in deserts, but rather were nurtured by a newly evolved habitat of humid, wooded floodplains.

    The findings, he said, dampen both the desert hypothesis of Romer and a newer inter-tidal theory put forth by Grzegorz Niedbwiedzki and colleagues at the University of Warsaw. In 2010, they published their discovery of eight-foot-long, 395-million-year-old tetrapods in ancient lagoonal mud in southeastern Poland, where Retallack also has been studying fossil soils with Polish colleague Marek Narkeiwicz.

    "Ancient soils and sediments at sites for transitional fossils around the world are critical for understanding when and under what conditions fish first walked," Retallack said. "The Darwin fish of chrome adorning many car trunks represents a particular time and place in the long evolutionary history of life on earth."


    Published in the Journal of Geology.

    Comments

    HedgehogFive
    Concerning the palaeontologist A.S.Romer, the Hedgehog remembers his book Man and the Vertebrates, originally published in 1933 but still being republished in 1970 by Pelican (the Brainy Human’s Version of Penguin Books.) 

    The discovery of Livoniana in 2000 was, perhaps, one link in forming the new view of tetrapods.  A BBC Horizon programme early in 2001 put forward the idea that the development of legs enabled their ancestors to push aside the thick Devonian weed and hide from the big armour-headed predatory fishes that were around at the time.
     
    Perhaps a case of the meek inheriting the Earth?