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    Please Bring Us A Driverless Car Future Soon
    By News Staff | June 24th 2014 03:20 PM | 5 comments | Print | E-mail | Track Comments

    Driving is no fun any more. When is the last time you saw someone buy a pair of driving gloves? These days, it is a chore. It would be much better to let someone else take the wheel but the only viable alternative is public transportation - and about the first time some crazy hobo screams at you and your family, they are never going to want to take it again. 

    If Big Brother is the trade-off for being able to read a book without having some hobo peeing next to us on the subway, bring it on. Chauffeurs are tedious and expensive so that means we need a driverless car. Yes, Google will be selling everything we do to advertisers, but that is still the best way to go. To make it a reality will require a convergence of embedded sensors, computer vision, artificial intelligence, control and automation. 

    This week, researchers from Carnegie Mellon University are demonstrating one of the most advanced autonomous vehicles ever designed, capable of navigating on urban roads and highways without human intervention. The car was brought to Washington, D.C., at the request of Congressman Bill Shuster of Pennsylvania, who participated in a 33-mile drive in the autonomous vehicle between a Pittsburgh suburb and the city's airport last September. 




    The CMU-developed Cadillac SRX looks like any other car on the road, but hidden sensors, cameras and computers allow it to navigate on urban roads and highways without human intervention. No, you won't be able to afford one. In the future, you will probably be eating protein pellets and still be stuck riding the bus. But at least the bus will have no driver. Credit: Carnegie Mellon University


    The car is the result of more than a decade of research and development by scientists and engineers and has advanced the underlying technologies--sensors, software, wireless communications and network integration--required to make sure a vehicle on the road is as safe--and ultimately safer--without a driver than with one. In the case of the Washington, D.C., demonstration, an engineer will be on hand to take the wheel if required.

    "This technology has been enabled by remarkable advances in the seamless blend of computation, networking and control into physical objects--a field known as cyber-physical systems," said Cora Marrett, NSF deputy director. "The National Science Foundation has long supported fundamental research that has built a strong foundation to enable cyber-physical systems to become a reality--like Dr. Raj Rajkumar's autonomous car."

    Raj Rajkumar, a professor of electrical and computer engineering and robotics at CMU, is a leader not just in autonomous vehicles, but in the broader field of cyber-physical systems, or CPS. Such systems are already in use in sectors such as agriculture, energy, healthcare and advanced manufacturing, and they are poised to make an impact in transportation as well.

    "Federal funding has been critical to our work in dealing with the uncertainties of real-world operating conditions, making efficient real-time usage of on-board computers, enabling vehicular communications and ensuring safe driving behaviors," Rajkumar said.




    Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University demonstrate the autonomous vehicle they developed with NSF support at an event in September 2013. Their driverless car arrived in Washington, D.C., in June 2014 for a demonstration at the Capitol. Credit: Carnegie Mellon University

    In 2007, Carnegie Mellon's then state-of-the-art driverless car, BOSS, took home the $2 million grand prize in the DARPA Urban Challenge, which pitted the leading autonomous vehicles in the world against one another in a challenging, urban environment. The new vehicle that Rajkumar is demonstrating in Washington, D.C., is the successor to that vehicle.

    Unlike BOSS, which was rigged with visible antennas and large sensors, CMU's new car--a Cadillac SRX--doesn't appear particularly "smart." In fact, it looks much like any other car on the road. However, top-of-the-line radar, cameras, sensors and other technologies are built into the body of the vehicle. The car's computers are tucked away under the floor.

    The goal of CMU's researchers is simple but important: To develop a driverless car that can decrease injuries and fatalities on roads. Automotive accidents result in 1.2 million fatalities annually around the world and cost citizens and governments $518 billion. It is estimated that 90 percent of those accidents are caused by human error.

    "Because computers don't get distracted, sleepy or angry, they can actually keep us much safer--that is the promise of this technology," Rajkumar said. "Over time, the technology will augment automotive safety significantly."

    In addition to controlling the steering, speed and braking, the autonomous systems in the vehicle also detect and avoid obstacles in the road, including pedestrians and bicyclists.

    In their demonstration in D.C., cameras in the vehicle will visually detect the status of traffic lights and respond appropriately. In collaboration with the D.C. Department of Transportation, the researchers have even added a technology that allows some of the traffic lights in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Washington to wirelessly communicate with the car, telling it the status of the lights ahead.

    NSF has supported Rajkumar's work on autonomous vehicles since 2005, but it is not the only project of this kind that NSF supports. In addition to CMU's driverless car, NSF supports Sentry, an autonomous underwater vehicle deployed at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, and several projects investigating unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) including those in use in search and rescue and disaster recovery operations. Moreover, NSF supports numerous projects that advance the fundamental theories and applications that underlie all autonomous vehicles and other cyber-physical systems.

    In the last five years, NSF has invested over $200 million in CPS research and education, building a foundation for the smart systems of the future.



    Comments

    Michael Martinez
    Without ironclad security these kinds of vehicles will be useful to just about anyone who wants to terrorize large populations.  Autonomous cars can be rigged with explosives, sent into crowds, used to block highway systems, and also act as free-ranging independent communications networks.
    People need to understand that there will be no putting this genie back into the bottle without a complete collapse of civilization or another technology that makes driverless cars obsolete.
    MikeCrow
    Autonomous cars can be rigged with explosives, sent into crowds
    There doesn't appear to be a shortage of people willing to drive said cars.

    I look forward to getting my first autonomous car, as long as I can drive when I want to.
    Never is a long time.
    Hank
    Sure, these were the concerns of the original cars too. And they were right, plenty of people have driven trucks full of explosives into bazaars and even the World Trade Center. But by worrying about security, people will take steps to minimize security.

    I have no issue with this. A manual override will be fine, and fun for a half hour here or there. But I'd rather be writing in the car than driving it.
    Thor Russell
    I look forward to driverless cars also. Massive economic benefit if they are allowed to display their potential in traffic etc. I am more worried about flying drones than cars. e.g. you dont even need a gun on a quadcopter, a dropping a brick is bad enough. Much harder to trace who did it.Cant stop them either otherwise its just crims who use them and we have the downside but no upside.
    Thor Russell
    Michael Martinez
    Hm.  Imagine all the pranks kids and drunk adults would use these kinds of vehicles for.  Danger doesn't always come from organized crime and terrorists.  While it might cut down on drunken driving it could lead to an increase in punken ... driving.  Or something like that.
    The future would be safer without us but I don't want to miss out on it either.  :)