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    Standard Model: Evidence For Direct Decay Of The Higgs Boson Into Fermions
    By News Staff | June 22nd 2014 03:09 PM | 5 comments | Print | E-mail | Track Comments

    The Higgs boson was detected using its decay into bosons but scientists from the CMS experiment at  the Large Hadron Collider have found evidence for the direct decay of the Higgs boson into fermions.

    If the Higgs particle can decay into both bosons and fermions, we can exclude certain theories predicting that the Higgs particle does not couple to fermions. As a group of elementary particles, fermions form the matter while bosons act as force carriers between fermions.  

    According to the standard model of particle physics, the interaction strength between the fermions and the Higgs field must be proportional to their mass. "This prediction was confirmed," explains Professor Vincenzo Chiochia from the University of Zurich's Physics Institute, "a strong indication that the particle discovered in 2012 actually behaves like the Higgs particle proposed in the theory." 


    Combined data analysis



    The researchers analyzed the data gathered at the LHC between 2011 and 2012, combining the Higgs decays into bottom quarks and tau leptons, both of which belong to the fermion particle group. The results reveal that an accumulation of these decays comes about at a Higgs particle mass near 125 gigaelectron volts (GeV) and with a significance of 3.8 sigma.

    This means that the probability of the background alone fluctuating up by this amount or more is about one in 14,000. In particle physics, a discovery is deemed confirmed from a significance of five sigma.


    How the Higgs decay modes were measured



    Three different processes were studied, whereby the UZH researchers analyzed the Higgs decay into taus. Because the Higgs particle is extremely short-lived, it cannot be detected directly, but rather only via its decay products.

    The bottom quarks and taus, however, have a long enough lifetime to be measured directly in the CMS experiment's pixel detector.




    Comments

    Lets be clear, something decayed into a fermion. The LHC has not proven to have found a Higgs Boson. They have shown a statistical number indicating some things previously unknown and multiple eV exist. I will remind everyone of the past articles every time they found something, the theories were tweeked to wrap it into higgs boson.

    So what we have is something unknown is decaying into fermions, it might be the higgs boson. Let me know when someone actually detects a higgs boson directly or can manipulate it in some what that doesnt require six sigma statistical awards.

    Mark my words...the more we find out about it, the more we will find out (the particle and theory) does not fit our previous predictions. Unfortunately proponents will go to unimaginable extreme efforts to explain why it is incorrect when all we need to do is consider an alternative theory-something Einstein suggested prior to the development of Quantum Mechanics. -

    A New Standard Model-
    A theory based on a simple mathematical interpretation is all that is
    missing - not the description of a contrived particle that offers its existence
    to this theory today and another tomorrow. A model should predict nature, not the other way around. Stay tuned see you guys next year...when the Higgs Model gets "revised" to accept new observations!
    In the meantime... The New Standard Model -

    http://www.amazon.com/New-Standard-Model-Introduction-Dimensional-ebook/...

    fundamentally
    Mr Adams,The models of contemporary physics are usually based on the concept of the wave function, which is a continuous function that describes something that may have a fine grain stochastic nature. This means that the corresponding toolkit is based on descriptors that make use of the continuity of the characteristics of particles. Thus it enables the power of Lie groups and Lie algebras and everything that is based on these tools.
    In this way what exists beneath the wave function stays non-observed and keeps being ignored by contemporary physics.

    The attitude of many physicists that every significant physical statement must be verified by experiments, keeps this situation in place and cultivates it.
    It is foolish to forbid to deliberate about non-observable features and phenomena.
    Enough information is available that restricts what exists beneath the blurred view that the wave function offers. The squared modulus of the wave function is a probability density distribution. Thus it is a normalized version of a continuous location density distribution. This continuous function can describe a discrete location density distribution. What are these locations?

    If you want to discover new things, then go to regions that others for some reason do not want to enter.

    Hans
    If you think, think twice
    Love this stuff!

    fundamentally
    If the Higgs is an elementary particle, then the word "elementary" means "not a composite".The Higgs is detected by observing the debris that are generated by collisions.
    When an electron disintegrates into photons, then, according to pair annihilation theory, it must fist merge with a positron and that combination will then split into two photons that depart in different directions. The reverse possibility exists as well. Two photons combine into something that then splits into an electron and a positron. This pair production and pair annihilation process also exists for other elementary particles and the photons can be replaced with other bosons.
    What is the supposed fine grain process that occurs with the Higgs particle? 
    Is it really an elementary particle or is it a (temporary) composite? 
    The real importance of the Higgs is not the particle. It is the Higgs field, or even more interesting, the Higgs mechanism.
    The Higgs mechanism may explain how the Higgs field offers mass to certain types of elementary particles, but it does not explain how these particles subsequently are capable to curve their embedding environment.
    Other theories exist that explain how elementary particles curve their embedding environment. 
    To my opinion such theories, when correct, are superior to the Higgs mechanism.
    If you think, think twice