Banner
    Violent Video Games Alter Young Brains
    By News Staff | December 4th 2011 03:00 PM | 1 comment | Print | E-mail | Track Comments
    The controversy over whether or not violent video games are potentially harmful to players has been debated for many years, even making it to the Supreme Court in 2010. There has been little scientific evidence demonstrating that the games have a prolonged negative neurological effect but sustained changes in the region of the brain associated with cognitive function and emotional control were found in young adult men after one week of playing violent video games, according to study results presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

    For the study, 28 healthy adult males, age 18 to 29, with low past exposure to violent video games were randomly assigned to two groups of 14. Members of the first group were instructed to play a shooting video game for 10 hours at home for one week and refrain from playing the following week. The second group did not play a video game at all during the two-week period.

    Each of the 28 men underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis at the beginning of the study, with follow-up exams at one and two weeks. During fMRI, the participants completed an emotional interference task, pressing buttons according to the color of visually presented words. Words indicating violent actions were interspersed among nonviolent action words. In addition, the participants completed a cognitive inhibition counting task.



    A sample of randomly assigned young adults showed less activation in certain frontal brain regions following a week of playing violent video games at home. Credit: Indiana University School of Medicine

    Young men were supplied with laptop computers and played at home in their "natural environment", in contrast to some of the previous research, which was done with players participating in a lab setting. The results showed that after one week of violent game play, the video game group members showed less activation in the left inferior frontal lobe during the emotional Stroop task and less activation in the anterior cingulate cortex during the counting Stroop task, compared to their baseline results and the results of the control group after one week. After the video game group refrained from game play for an additional week, the changes to the executive regions of the brain returned closer to the control group. Stroop task tests an individual's ability to control cognitive flexibility and attention.

    "For the first time, we have found that a sample of randomly assigned young adults showed less activation in certain frontal brain regions following a week of playing violent video games at home," said Yang Wang, M.D., assistant research professor in the Indiana University School of Medicine Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences. "The affected brain regions are important for controlling emotion and aggressive behavior. These findings indicate that violent video game play has a long-term effect on brain functioning. These effects may translate into behavioral changes over longer periods of game play."

    Comments

    Do the quoted findings not contradict the observations here?
    How is: "After the video game group refrained from game play for an additional week, the changes to the executive regions of the brain returned closer to the control group." consistent with a conclusion that: "violent video game play has a long-term effect on brain functioning".

    Any new and prolonged practice / learning experience presumably has some effect on related stimulus-response for a while, but once the behaviour is no longer new, and the brain has integrated the required learning,and has established the all important context relevance for that learning, just how reliably can we use the fact that brains learn, to conclude that violent video games are harmful to players?
    With enough practice and repetition, I can learn to dribble a basket ball, such that the next time someone throws me one, I will likely indeed respond by doing so - but this in no way implies I would be more likely to shoot hoops with an inappropriate object (for example with somebody's baby), despite my new skills.

    Anyone unable to apply this kind of judgement probably should not be playing video games for sure, but equally they should not be exposed to sport, or religion, or books, given the equally if not more violent passions such things can potentially evoke.