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Quantum Cheshire Cat: Scientists Separate A Particle From Its 'Grin'

In Lewis Caroll's novel "Alice in Wonderland", the Cheshire Cat could disappear but its grin remained...

Achalasia Esophagus Disease Is Autoimmune

Achalasia is a rare disease, affecting 1 in 100,000 people, characterized by a loss of nerve cells...

Virtual Water Shortage By 2040

Two new papers postulate that there will be a water crisis by 2040. Not because of population,...

Teach For America Efforts Show School Board Politics Alive And Well

Teach For America is a group that recruits recent college graduates to teach in poorer public schools...

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You may never have heard of the Perkins high-speed diesel engine but the system is still used in numerous buses, taxis, ambulances, fire engines and ships of today.

Autobiographical notes written by the Lancashire inventor of the engine have been recovered from a garage in Manchester after lying forgotten for 25 years. University of Manchester historian Dr. Yaakov Wise -- who made the discovery -- says the Charles Chapman manuscript gives a unique insight into that 1932 "world beater."

Dr Wise, who worked at the legendary Perkins Engines where Chapman was based was given the document in 1983 - four years after the inventor died aged 82- but rediscovered it after clearing out a garage 25 years later.

‘Mother cells’ which produce the neurons affected by Parkinson’s disease have been identified by scientists, according to new research published in the journal Glia.

The new discovery could pave the way for future treatments for the disease, including the possibility of growing new neurons, and the cells which support them, in the lab. Scientists hope these could then be transplanted into patients to counteract the damage caused by Parkinson’s.

The new study focuses on dopaminergic neurons – brain cells which produce and use the chemical dopamine to communicate with surrounding neurons. The researchers found that these important neurons are created when a particular type of cell in the embryonic brain divides during the early stages of brain development in the womb.

Green tea is high in the antioxidant EGCG (epigallocatechin-3- gallate) which helps prevent the body’s cells from becoming damaged and prematurely aged.

Studies have suggested that the combination of green tea and EGCG may also be beneficial by providing protection against certain types of cancers, including breast cancer.

A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Mississippi researchers now finds that consuming EGCG significantly inhibits breast tumor growth in female mice. These results bring us one step closer to better understanding the disease and potentially new and naturally occurring therapies.

Scrapie can be transmitted to lambs through milk, according to new research published in BMC Veterinary Research. The study provides important information on the transmission of this prion-associated disease and the control of scrapie in affected flocks. Scrapie is a fatal neurodegenerative disease of sheep and goats.

Clinical signs include itchiness, head tremor, wool loss and skin lesions as well as changes in behaviour and gait.

Timm Konold and colleagues from the Veterinary Laboratories Agency in Weybridge, UK, investigated the transmission of scrapie by feeding milk from scrapie-affected ewes to lambs that are genetically susceptible to contracting scrapie. The researchers were looking for the presence of the prion protein, PrPd, which is associated with the disease.

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder(ADHD) is a behavioral disorder, usually first diagnosed in childhood, that is characterized by inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity.

Children with ADHD appear likely to experience sleep problems, according to a report in the April issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine. Sleep problems in these children may be associated with poorer child psychosocial quality of life, child daily functioning, caregiver mental health and family functioning.

Mice given caffeine equivalent to a human drinking six to eight cups of coffee a day were protected from developing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for the human disease Multiple Sclerosis (MS), according to researchers at Cornell University.

Caffeine is a well-known adenosine receptor blocker, and the researchers believe results show the importance of this molecule in permitting the infiltration of immune cells into the central nervous system of patients with MS.

Dr. Jeffrey H. Mills, a postdoctoral associate in the laboratory of Dr. Margaret S. Bynoe, presented the findings at Experimental Biology 2008 on April 7. The presentation was part of the scientific programs of the American Society of Immunologists.