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Racial Disparity In Cancer Mortality Continued To Narrow After 2000

Cancer mortality remains significantly elevated among African-Americans but if recent trends continue...

Half Of Cardiac Arrest Patients Then Suffer Cognitive Problems

Half of all patients who survive a cardiac arrest experience problems with cognitive functions...

Infectious Ants Become Antisocial

Looking after yourself, and trying not to infect others, is a good strategy to prevent disease...

Singular Value Decomposition Method Increases Accuracy Of Ovarian Cancer Diagnosis

Nearly anyone touched by ovarian cancer will tell you that almost 80 percent of patients reach...

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Most people consume far too much salt, and a University of Iowa researcher has discovered one potential reason we crave it: it might put us in a better mood.

UI psychologist Kim Johnson and colleagues found in their research that when rats are deficient in sodium chloride, common table salt, they shy away from activities they normally enjoy, like drinking a sugary substance or pressing a bar that stimulates a pleasant sensation in their brains.

"Things that normally would be pleasurable for rats didn't elicit the same degree of relish, which leads us to believe that a salt deficit and the craving associated with it can induce one of the key symptoms associated with depression," Johnson said.
It makes sense that ecological changes caused by humans affect natural biodiversity and, in some cases, can even cause permanent displacement of a species.

Unless science revives it.

Researchers from Eawag and from two German universities (Frankfurt and Konstanz), analyzed genetic material from Daphnia eggs up to 100 years old and say the eutrophication of Greifensee and Lake Constance in the 1970s and 1980s led to genetic changes in a species of water flea which was ultimately displaced. Despite the fact that water quality has since been significantly improved, this species has not been re-established.   Naturally, anyway.


Daphnia Galeata.  Photo: Eaweg University
Astronomers have obtained exceptional 3D views of distant galaxies, seen when the Universe was half its current age, by combining the the Hubble Space Telescope’s acute eye and the ESO’s Very Large Telescope to probe the motions of gas in tiny objects. By looking at this unique “history book” of our Universe, at an epoch when the Sun and the Earth did not yet exist, scientists hope to solve the puzzle of how galaxies formed in the remote past.
Herd mentality. Angry mob. Mass hysteria. As these phrases suggest, we are not always confident that a large group of people will come up with the smartest decisions.

But numerous studies have shown that a crowd of people usually gives more accurate responses to questions compared to an individual and averaging the responses provided from a group increases accuracy by canceling out a number of errors made across the board, like over- and under-estimating the answer.
A new study from North Carolina State University shows that painted road markings, such as the lines separating traffic lanes, are significantly better at reflecting headlights in the direction that the paint was applied. This finding will help determine how states comply with new federal safety regulations and save money on painting their roadways.
What's in a name? Perhaps more (or less) money.  Before employers have a chance to judge job applicants on their merits, they may have already judged them on the sound of their names, says  a study published in the latest issue of the Journal of Labor Economics.