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Research Shows That Bacteria Survive Longer In Contact Lens Cleaning Solution Than Thought

Each year in the UK, bacterial infections cause around 6,000 cases of a severe eye condition known...

Creative Activities Outside Work Can Improve Job Performance

SAN FRANCISCO -- Employees who pursue creative activities outside of work may find that these activities...

Key Milestone For Brown Fat Research With A Ground-breaking MRI Scan

The first MRI scan to show 'brown fat' in a living adult could prove to be an essential step towards...

Sprifermin Offers Benefit For Cartilage Loss From Knee Osteoarthritis

In a new study in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, at 12 months, total femorotibial...

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The latest common wisdom on carbohydrates claims that eating so-called “bad” carbohydrates will make you fat, but University of Virginia professor Glenn Gaesser says, “that’s just nonsense.” Eating sandwiches with white bread, or an occasional doughnut, isn't going to kill you, or necessarily even lead to obesity, he said.

In an article in the October issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Gaesser analyzes peer-reviewed, scientific research on carbohydrate consumption, glycemic index and body weight and gives the first detailed review of the literature on the correlation between them. His findings run counter to the current consensus on the effects of “good” and “bad” carbohydrates.

As they root for the home team from the bleachers this fall, high school gridiron fans in the small Illinois town of Tolono don’t necessarily see anything out of the ordinary down on the field.

But just out of sight, tucked inside many of the maroon helmets worn by the Unity High School Rockets, a revolution of sorts is taking place.

This is a conceptual animation showing how polar ice reflects light from the sun. As this ice begins to melt, less sunlight gets reflected into space. It is instead absorbed into the oceans and land, raising the overall temperature, and fueling further melting.

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Conceptual Image Lab



As policy makers debate what levels of ozone in the air are safe for humans to breathe, studies in mice are revealing that the inhaled pollutant impairs the body’s first line of defense, making it more susceptible to subsequent foreign invaders, such as bacteria.

While it has long been known that exposure to ozone, a major component of urban air pollution, is associated with increased cardiovascular and pulmonary hospitalizations and deaths, the actual mechanisms involved remain unclear. New studies by Duke University Medical Center pulmonary researchers on the effects of ozone on the innate immune system, the body’s “tripwire” for foreign invaders, may provide part of the answer.

The work of a Kansas State University professor is challenging the assumption that genetically engineered plants are the great scientific and technological revolution in agriculture and the only efficient and cheap way to feed a growing population.

Jianming Yu, an assistant professor of agronomy, is teaming with Rex Bernardo, a professor of agronomy and plant genetics at the University of Minnesota, on research with marker-assisted selection. This agricultural technology offers a sophisticated method to greatly accelerate classical breeding through genetic analysis and selection of existing natural diversity in various crops without having to resort to alien species.

Women have multiple options for preventing pregnancy but men have only two - vasectomy, which is usually permanent, and condoms, which can become tiresome in long-term relationships. For decades, pundits have predicted new contraceptives for men within the next 5 to 10 years but new technology at the second "Future of Male Contraception" conference says new solutions may finally be close:

a) Researchers from the University of Washington used testosterone gel, which is marketed for men with low testosterone, plus a progestin shot used as a female contraceptive under the name "DepoProvera." The men got a shot once every 3 months and rubbed on a gel every day, and it worked well at knocking out sperm in 90% of them.