Science & Society

Buddy Dyer, a government worker in Orlando, stated, at approximately 12:30 PM on Sunday, June 12, 2016, soon after the mass shootings in Orlando, that the most important thing right now is to waive the HIPAA laws so the physicians taking care of 53 injured patients can communicate with their distraught family members.
Death touches everyone at some stage during their lives, and usually more than once.

It also triggers certain laws around what happens to the body after death – and some glaring omissions.

1. Corpse disposal – the basics

Respect for the dead and protecting public health make burial or cremation an urgent task when someone dies. Certain aspects are heavily regulated – such as the minimum depth of graves, the siting and management of burial grounds and crematoria – but there are comparatively few laws governing actual bodily disposal. For example, there are no set time limits for disposing of the dead.

While American news media speculates about how much of Omar Mateen's motivation for his attack on a gay nightclub in Orlando was due to Muslim beliefs and how much was due to anti-gay sentiment, the ease with which someone can enter soft targets has renewed concern about the Euro 2016 soccer tournament in France, especially after the lack of domestic intelligence made it relatively easy for November’s terrorist attacks on the Stade de France and the January 2015 shootings at Charlie Hebdo.
For what seems like decades, it has been open season on scientists and corporations by environmental non-profit corporations and the PR groups they fund to be their hatchet men, like SourceWatch and Mother Jones. Libel? No problem, Lisa Graves at SourceWatch will do it. Spinning stolen funding proposals provided by a fired employee as actual conspiracy events? Mother Jones will oblige.
While watching the Stanley Cup match on Saturday, the first period ended and legendary sportscaster Bob Costas appeared on the screen with the Lexus Intermission Report.It made me chuckle seeing an overt corporate placement because the day before, a blogger at the political website Mother Jones named Tom Philpott had asked me on Twitter what I thought of a new EPA paper on the herbicide atrazine.
23andme offers detailed genetic ancestry. In my case: Ancestral Composition

In a global pie chart diagram the table corresponds to 
Pie Chart Ancestral Composition


Chromosomal map
Chromosomal map
IdiocracyI ran into, "Anti-Intellectualism and the "Dumbing Down" of America," by Ray Williams on a Facebook post, leading me to other such material: "The Dumbest Generation: How the Digital Age Stupefies Young Americans and Jeopardizes Our Future," by Mark B
Consumers are aware of genetically modified crops but their knowledge level is limited and often at odds with the facts, according to a new paper in the FASEB journal.

Last year, Brandon McFadden, an assistant professor of food and resource economics at the UF Institute of Food and Agricultural ‌Sciences, published a study that showed scientific facts scarcely change consumers’ impressions of genetically modified food and other organisms.

(Part of an occasional series.)

There are several ways of measuring risks. Two of the most commonly used are absolute risk and relative risk.

Medical societies recommend that patients with advanced cancer receive palliative care soon after diagnosis, and receive hospice care for at least the last three days of their life. Those recommendations don't match real-life practice, according to Risha Gidwani, DrPH, a health economist at Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Economics Resource Center and colleagues who examined care received by all veterans over the age of 65 with cancer who died in 2012, a total of 11,896 individuals.