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BPA – Nothing New Under The Sun?

It’s been shown that the primary route of human exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) is through the...

BPA Exposure In Canada - How Low Can You Go?

A recent analysis of published data on human exposure to bisphenol A (BPA...

Is Anyone Safe From BPA?

Everyone has heard about bisphenol A (BPA).  It’s primarily used as a raw material to...

Did BPA Bite The Dust?

A common definition of the word dust refers to fine, dry particles of matter.  From dust...

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Steve HentgesRSS Feed of this column.

Steven G. Hentges holds a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Stanford University and a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Minnesota. He is the Executive Director of the Read More »

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It’s widely understood that a key reason why life developed on Earth is because of water.  A common definition of a habitable environment is one in which plenty of liquid water is available to sustain life.  In short, we can’t live without water.

The headline almost jumps out at you – “BPA Substitute Could Cause Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes.”  That alarming headline appears in an industry publication, but the same story was widely reported in the popular media, which tends to cover science only when they can create scare stories.<

It’s not hard these days to find stories in the popular media about the presence of various chemical contaminants in our environment.  Included in this genre are stories about trace levels of chemicals in common consumer products, in the air we breathe, and in the water we drink.  Almost inevitably the stories suggest that even minor exposures are harming our health. 

A recent study from French government researchers reported new results on the exposure of pregnant women to more than 100 substances that might be a concern for the health of a developing fetus.  The study examined exposure to various metals (e.g., lead, mercury, arsenic) and many common organic compounds that we might encounter in our daily lives.

Not that many years ago, many reusable food and beverage containers on the market worldwide were made from polycarbonate plastic.  Polycarbonate, which is made from bisphenol A (BPA), is an almost ideal material for these products since its clarity is comparable to glass, making it easy to see what’s inside, and it’s virtually shatter-proof – an important attribute for consumer products that could be dropped. 

With the high level of attention to bisphenol A (BPA) over the years, it’s easy to get the impression that BPA is everywhere and we’re constantly being exposed to high and harmful levels in our daily lives.  You might even have seen BPA referred to as an “everywhere chemical.”