This is what I would do: Princeton's Integrated Science curriculum. This is how science should be taught:
Normally, I leave the Cracked.com to Michael.  Their offering yesterday on The 5 Most Popular Safety Laws That Don't Work, however, seemed right up my alley.  I like to think of it as a 5 step take down of the "if it only saves one life it is worth it" argument (aka, benefit-only analysis, as opposed to cost-benefit analysis), while validating my hatred of ubiquitous speed bumps (Duke University, you know what roads I mean).  And, of course, one should always consider who that one life you are saving belongs to. 

The International Year of Astronomy continues its celebration with a photo of triple galaxy group April 1 and 2. 140,000 people around the world voted on six potential targets; the Arp 274 galaxy group won with 67,000 votes.

Photo from Wired

For some reason I really want a Milky Way Dairy Queen Blizzard... Thanks to Wired for the photo and the following description.

The True History of a Windbag


Ideas in etymology are like ideas in general.  Just as there is the carefully researched and formulated scientific theory as against 'just an idea', so with etymology. It is to be expected that as language becomes more widely researched, so the false etymologies still current will be displaced.

This blog is part 2 of an occasional series in false etymology, Part 1 may be found  here.
Of impacient Folys that wyll nat abyde correccioun
Unto our Folys Shyp let hym come hastely
On March 17th 2009 Europe's first geodetic satellite was successfully launched from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome in Russia. The first stages of putting the satellite in a stable recording orbit are proceeding according to plans. So far, so good.

GOCE inside
Credit: ESA - AOES Medialab

Spinning a Yarn


Ideas in etymology are like ideas in general.  Just as there is the carefully researched and formulated scientific theory as against 'just an idea', so with etymology. It is to be expected that as language becomes more widely researched, so the false etymologies still current will be displaced.

This blog is part 1 of an occasional series in false etymology, Part 2  may be found  here.

Windbag The Sailor Spins a Yarn

Combine an elementary physics formula, f=m*a, with a hunk of wood or composite material and you get hockey's most powerful shot - the slapshot.

Every year before the NHL All-Star game, players compete for the title of fastest slapshot in the league. This year's winner: Boston Bruins' mammoth defenseman, Zdeno Chara, with a 105.4 mph shot, a skills competition all-time record.  (However, hockey great Bobby Hull's slapshot was once recorded at 118.3 mph - and Hull is almost a foot shorter than Chara.)
The Age of Plastic

The term 'plastic' means, generally,  'easily moulded or shaped'.

Online dictionaries tend to show only a few of the very many variants and meanings of the term 'plastic'.
I have tried here to compile a list of the more frequent uses of the term  'plastic' across the internet.
That list may be found at the foot of this article.

The Plasticity of the Word 'Plastic'.
I came across a blog today, written by a female scientist (apparently - it's an anonymous blog and that's okay, if Obama's teleprompter can have a blog I suppose anyone sentient can also, but anonymity speaks of a certain paranoia) and she wondered if men perceived science setbacks differently than women.   So I began to wonder too.
Please be warned.

The only link to science is really the single word "ornithologist".

Unless you are studying humour, that is.

For The Birds, a very short story worth reading.