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    Progress: Diet And Lifestyle Advice For Diabetes 'No Different' Than General Public
    By News Staff | October 14th 2013 06:30 AM | 1 comment | Print | E-mail | Track Comments

    A new paper suggests that lifestyle advice for people with diabetes should be no different from that for the general public - but diabetes may benefit more from that same advice. 

    In the study, the researchers investigated whether the associations between lifestyle factors and mortality risk differ between individuals with and without diabetes.

    Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a cohort was formed of 6,384 persons with diabetes and 258,911 EPIC participants without known diabetes. Computer modelling was used to explore the relationship (in both those with and without diabetes) of mortality with the following risk factors: body-mass index, waist/height ratio, 26 food groups, alcohol consumption, leisure-time physical activity, smoking.

    The researchers found that overall mortality was 62% higher in people with diabetes compared with those without. Intake of fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds, pasta, poultry and vegetable oil was related to a lower mortality risk, and intake of butter and margarine was related to an increased mortality risk.

    While the strength of the association was different in those with diabetes versus those without, the associations were in the same direction in each case (see table 2 full paper). No differences between people with and without diabetes were detected for the other lifestyle factors including adiposity, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and smoking.

    The authors say: "It appears that the intake of some food groups is more beneficial (fruits, legumes, nuts, seeds, pasta, poultry, vegetable oil) or more detrimental (soft drinks, butter, margarine, cake, cookies) with respect to mortality risk in people with diabetes. This may indicate that individuals with diabetes may benefit more from a healthy diet than people without diabetes. However, since the directions of association were generally the same, recommendations for a healthy diet should be similar for people with or without diabetes."

    Published in Diabetologia.  




    Comments

    Given what we know about the effect of high glycemic carbohydrates this is dangerous evidence. One important addition to the diet would be transmax resveratrol, the supplement which has been shown in multiple double blind, peer-reviewed studies to lower blood glucose, reduce body fat, increase insulin sensitivity and protect against the adverse health consequences of both Type 1 and 2 Diabetes. Two new human clinical trail results were just released ten days ago by prestigious medical schools, one using Bioforte and the other using Transmax Resveratrol on by patients who were also taking Metformin like drugs. In these studies blood pressure and the above parameters were all improved versus taking Metformin alone. 234336300