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Only One Third Of Dr. Oz Show Recommendations Is Believable, Finds Analysis

Televisiom programs such as "The Dr. Oz Show" and "The Doctors" have attracted massive followings...

Weighing Trees - Now With Lasers

A terrestrial laser scanning technique that allows the structure of vegetation to be 3D-mapped...

Why Some People Are Better Navigators: Brain's 'Homing' Signal Identified

It's no secret that some people are better at navigating than others, but it has been unclear why...

Shale Gas Is Here To Stay - Here Are Ways To Keep It Safe And Productive

Though the New York governor recently made a pretense of banning fracking in the state (it was...

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The ocean as an ecological and physical system is unmatched in its complexity but researchers are getting closer. A team of scientists is studying the complex ocean upwelling process by mimicking nature – pumping cold, nutrient-rich water from deep within the Pacific Ocean and releasing it into surface waters near Hawaii that lack the nitrogen and phosphorous necessary to support high biological production.

The researchers are harnessing the power of the ocean to conduct their experiments, using the up-and-down motion of waves to pump deep water to the surface. Their next step is to create a pump that can withstand the rigors of the rugged Pacific and then see if the biology follows the physics.

The theory behind the experiment was published in Marine Ecology Progress Series and the initial test of the pumps and their effect in the open ocean is getting its own documentary on the Discovery Channel, scheduled to air September 5th.

West Australian health experts are urging older people to get active after trial results show for the first time that just 20 minutes of activity each day can prevent memory deterioration. In a world-first, a team from the WA Centre for Health and Ageing (WACHA) based at the Western Australian Institute for Medical Research (WAIMR) say their trials results in the Journal of the American Medical Association have shown that regular physical activity can lead to a lasting improvement in memory function.

WACHA director Professor Leon Flicker said people over the age of 50 could proactively prevent memory deterioration by joining in simple and easy exercises each day.

Molecular imaging aims at the use of imaging probes to visualize specific cellular or sub cellular processes that occur before changes in morphology and function. This is highly relevant because impairments of such processes often are precursors or earliest stages of cardiovascular disease. They are also involved in the early response to therapy or may identify candidates most suitable for a specific therapy.

Probes for multiple molecular pathways, including cardiac metabolism, cell death, neurotransmission, receptors, cell-matrix interaction and cell trafficking have been developed in early experimental work and are increasingly translated into the clinical arena.

Variation in the gene for one of the receptors for the hormone vasopressin appears to be associated with how human males bond with their partners, according to an international team of researchers.

The researchers found that the "334" allele of a common AVPR1A variation, the human version of avpr1a studied in voles, seemed to have negative effects on men's relationship with their spouses.

"Our findings are particularly interesting because they show that men who are in a relatively stable relationship of five years of more who have one or two copies of allele 334 appear to be less bonded to their partners than men with other forms of this gene," says Jenae Neiderhiser, professor of psychology, Penn State. "We also found that the female partners of men with one or two copies of allele 334 reported less affection, consensus and cohesion in the marriage, but interestingly, did not report lower levels of marital satisfaction than women whose male partners had no copies of allele 334."

Being an athlete or merely a fan improves language skills when it comes to discussing their sport because parts of the brain usually involved in playing sports are instead used to understand sport language, new research at the University of Chicago shows.

The research was conducted on hockey players, fans, and people who'd never seen or played the game. It shows, for the first time, that a region of the brain usually associated with planning and controlling actions is activated when players and fans listen to conversations about their sport. The brain boost helps athletes and fans understanding of information about their sport, even though at the time when people are listening to this sport language they have no intention to act.

Older age among fathers may be associated with an increased risk for bipolar disorder in their offspring, according to a report in the September issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Bipolar disorder is a common, severe mood disorder involving episodes of mania and depression, according to background information in the article. Other than a family history of psychotic disorders, few risk factors for the condition have been identified. Older paternal age has previously been associated with a higher risk of complex neurodevelopmental disorders, including schizophrenia and autism.