Microbiology

Oxygen Overshoot: The Mass Extinction Of 75 Percent Of Life On Earth

Billions of years ago, an extinction occurred that dwarfed the event that wiped out the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. Its history is written in Canadian rocks and show Earth lost nearly 75 percent of its plant and animal species. But it had a benefit for ...

Article - News Staff - Mar 27 2020 - 6:31am

Getting To The Heart Of The Coronavirus Pandemic

Co-authored by by Lauren Philippi, Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph In late December 2019 an outbreak of pneumonia cases arose in Wuhan, China. Patients presented with an acute respiratory illness linked to the 201 ...

Article - W. Glen Pyle - Mar 30 2020 - 3:00pm

Evolution Could Make Future Viruses Even Weirder: Some Have The Building Blocks For Their Own Metabolism

Though they are called giant viruses they're still among the tiniest denizens of the microbiome. A few genes' worth of DNA or RNA folded into a shell so small you need an electron microscope to see it, more like a stripped-down husk of an organis ...

Article - News Staff - Apr 6 2020 - 10:09am

Over Half Of Brazil's Coronavirus Cases Arrived From Italy- And That Is WHO's Fault

Political critics can argue that the U.S. ...

Article - Hank Campbell - Apr 9 2020 - 5:31am

Wuhan To Europe To America- The Evolutionary Paths Of SARS-CoV-2

The early "evolutionary paths" SARS-CoV-2, the 2019 coronavirus that leads to COVID-19 in humans have been traced using phylogenetic network techniques and shows how it spread from Wuhan to Europe and America. While there are too many rapid mutat ...

Article - News Staff - Apr 9 2020 - 4:18pm

Coronavirus Is Not New, It's Been Evolving Along With Bats For Millions Of Years

Though coronavirus is known to much of the world by now, it is often used synonymously with COVID-19 by journalists. In scientific reality, there are a vast number of types of different coronaviruses, potentially as many as the thousands of bat species, bu ...

Article - News Staff - Apr 23 2020 - 10:57am

The Next Plague: Stenotrophomonas Maltophilia?

Though coronavirus is a new name for much of the world, microbiologists have worried about it for half a century. It is in the same family as the common cold virus but with the right mutation it can be deadly to those with risk factors for respiratory dise ...

Article - News Staff - May 14 2020 - 3:07pm

Coronavirus Risks In Public Bathrooms

Most public restrooms are grungy in the best of times. Now, we have the coronavirus risk to contend with, too. There are lots of risks – dirty sinks and door handles, airborne particles and other people in small, enclosed spaces who may or may not be brea ...

Article - The Conversation - Jun 5 2020 - 12:04pm

Measles Has Been With Us For At Least 8,000 Years- And Cities May Be Why

Environmental groups believe that living in cities is better for the environment but if there is one thing that COVID-19 has made clear, it's that living in cities is better for spreading infectious disease also.  Despite having numerous large cities, ...

Article - News Staff - Jun 22 2020 - 2:44pm

Phylloxera: The Worst Enemy Of Wine Gets Its Genome Mapped

Biologists have mapped the genome of phylloxera, an aphid-like pest capable of decimating vineyards. In so doing, they have identified nearly 3,000 genes enabling the insect to colonize and feed on grape vines by creating what are essentially nutritionally ...

Article - News Staff - Jul 30 2020 - 6:01am