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Torvosaurus tanneri

The specimen of Torvosaurus tanneri is currently on display in Madrid, Spain. The genus Torvosaurus...

Late Cretaceous: Mosasaur Detail

A close-up view of the dentition of an ancient aquatic, carnivorous lizard, the mighty Mosasaur...

Gods & Cephalopods

A great temple to the god Amon was built at Karnak in Upper Egypt around c. 1785. It is from Amon...

Paltechioceras of Wrangellia

Those working in the Jurassic exposures on Vancouver Island are a determined crew. Most of the...

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Heidi HendersonRSS Feed of this column.

Blue Planet, Explorer in Residence. Co-author of In Search of Ancient BC.

Fossil Huntress... Read More »

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The dinosaurs of Australia disappeared at the end of the Cretaceous, as they did the world over. Their departure marked the end of the supercontinent of Gondwana. By the middle of the Eocene, some fifty-five million years ago, only Australia, Antarctica and South America remained as it straddled the South Pole.



During the Miocene and Pliocene, 12-1.6 million years ago, a diverse group of extinct proboscideans, elephant-like animals walked the Earth. Most had four tusks and likely a trunk similar to modern elephants. They were beasts of legend, inspiring myths and stories of fanciful creatures to the first humans to encounter them.


Eleven elite paleo enthusiasts were flown into the Tyaughton area near Castle Peak north of Goldbridge 007-style in a shiny new Jet Ranger helicopter. We were interested in the local geology and fossils from the Jurassic-Triassic exposures high in the alpine.



Pterosaurs, the mighty winged-lizards, soared ancient skies expertly hunting for prey. Because they evolved from reptiles prior to modern birds, it was once believed that pterosaurs were primitive, passive fliers. They were seen as gliders, rather than skillfull hunters.



Enjoy star gazing? Lucky enough to be in the northern hemisphere August 11th and 12th?


Plant fossils from the Okanagan highlands, an area centred in the Interior of British Columbia, provide important clues to an ancient climate.