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Miscanes: Genetically Modified Sugarcane Can Grow Farther North

U.S. farmers have long hoped to extend sugarcane's growing range northward from the Gulf coast...

World Glacier Monitoring Service Says Melting Is Faster Than Ever

The World Glacier Monitoring Service, which compiles the results of worldwide glacier observations...

Probiotics For Frogs

A new paper says protective probiotics could fight the "chytrid" fungus that has been decimating...

Want To Quit Smoking? Strengthen Your Self-Control

The desire to quit smoking--often considered a requirement for enrolling in treatment programs...

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There’s a new study that’s getting a fair amount of attention in the climate science community and the popular press.


New research suggests concussion may not significantly impair symptoms or cognitive skills for one gender over another, however, women may still experience greater symptoms and poorer cognitive performance at preseason testing. The study released today will be presented at the Sports Concussion Conference in Denver, July 24 to 26, hosted by the American Academy of Neurology, the world's leading authority on diagnosing and managing sports concussion. The conference will feature the latest scientific advances in diagnosing and treating sports concussion from leading experts in the field.


We know that Greenpeace and other activist groups really,really care about bees. Really.

A new study by researchers at the University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy, Geriatric Unit&Laboratory of Gerontology and Geriatrics, IRCCS "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Foggia, Italy, and Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS), Roma, Italy, estimates the association between change or constant habits in coffee consumption and the incidence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), evaluating 1,445 individuals recruited from 5,632 subjects, aged 65-84 year old, from the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging (ILSA), a population-based sample from eight Italian municipalities with a 3.5-year median follow-up. These findings are published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.