Ants Filmed Building Moving Bridges From Their Live Bodies

Army ants build living bridges by linking their bodies to span gaps and create shortcuts across...

Study: Paying For Transgender Health Care Cost-effective

A new analysis led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that while most...

Have We Reached Peak Pizza?

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Scientists Get First Glimpse Of Black Hole Eating Star, Ejecting High-speed Flare

An international team of astrophysicists led by a Johns Hopkins University scientist has for the...

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Both in materials science and in biomedical research it is important to be able to view minute nanostructures, for example in carbon-fiber materials and bones. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), the University of Lund, Charite hospital in Berlin and the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) have now developed a new computed tomography method based on the scattering, rather than on the absorption, of X-rays. The technique makes it possible for the first time to visualize nanostructures in objects measuring just a few millimeters, allowing the researchers to view the precise three-dimensional structure of collagen fibers in a piece of human tooth.

Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have discovered that a dim, cool dwarf star is generating a surprisingly powerful magnetic field, one that rivals the most intense magnetic regions of our own Sun.

The star's extraordinary magnetic field is potentially associated with a constant flurry of solar-flare-like eruptions. As with our Sun, these flares would trace tightly wound magnetic field lines that act like cosmic particle accelerators: warping the path of electrons and causing them to emit telltale radio signals that can be detected with ALMA.

Such intense flare activity, the astronomers note, would barrage nearby planets with charged particles.

  • Fastest pigeons tend to become flock leaders

  • Leaders learn navigation skills more effectively than followers

    Many birds travel in flocks, sometimes migrating over thousands of miles. But how do the birds decide who will lead the way? Researchers at Oxford University, reporting in the journal Current Biology, can offer new insight based on studies in homing pigeons. For pigeons, it seems, leadership is largely a question of speed.

    'This changes our understanding of how the flocks are structured and why flocks of this species have consistent leadership hierarchies,' says co-author Dr Dora Biro of the Department of Zoology at Oxford.

  • As you're driving to work along a busy road, your eyes on the traffic lights ahead, hoping they won't turn to red, you pass signs warning of roadworks, ads on bus shelters... Suddenly a dog runs out in front of you. What are your chances of seeing it before it's too late?

    Even with 20/20 vision in broad daylight on a clear day, our peripheral vision can be surprisingly poor, particularly when the scene in front of us is cluttered. Now, scientists at the University of Cambridge, UK, Northeastern University, Boston, USA, and Queensland Brain Institute, Brisbane, Australia, believe they are a step closer to understanding why this is.