Banner
Will Eight On A Plate Catch On? Or Will Weak Observational Claims About Food Fail Again?

There are multiple food fads trying to catch on per year but as the saying goes in science, if...

Argument: President Trump Needs To Nationalize Health Care To Honor His Campaign Promise

You might think that after the November elections, the last group anyone will listen to for guidance...

Zika Linked To Miscarriages, Thin Brain Tissue In Babies

Zika virus can cross the placenta, intended to protect the developing fetus, and appears to lead...

Why Vegetable Farmers Aren't On Board The No-Till Train

No-till farming uses cover crops to conserve soil and suppress weeds but many vegetable producers...

User picture.
News StaffRSS Feed of this column.

News Releases From All Over The World, Right To You... Read More »

Blogroll

In the constellation Taurus, astronomers have found the youngest still-forming solar system yet seen - an infant star called  L1527 IRS, surrounded by a swirling disk of dust and gas 450 light-years from Earth.

The star only has about one-fifth the mass of the Sun, but will likely pull in material from its surroundings and eventually match the Sun's mass. The disk surrounding the young star contains at least enough mass to make seven Jupiters, the largest planet in our Solar System.

Smoke from Arctic wildfires have been drifting over the Greenland ice sheet, tarnishing the ice with soot and making it more likely to melt under the sun, according to satellite observations.

NASA's Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite captured smoke from Arctic fires billowing out over Greenland during the summer of 2012. Researchers have long been concerned with how the Greenland landscape is losing its sparkly reflective quality as temperatures rise. The surface is darkening as ice melts away, and, since dark surfaces are less reflective than light ones, the surface captures more heat, which leads to stronger and more prolonged melting.

Rather than just a single sense of location, the brain has a number of "modules" dedicated to self-location. Each module contains its own internal GPS-like mapping system that keeps track of movement, and has other characteristics that also distinguishes one from another.

How many different sense of location?  It's unclear.  At least four and perhaps as many as 10, according to  new research from the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience, at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology.  They say this is also the first time that researchers have been able to show that a part of the brain that does not directly respond to sensory input, called the association cortex, is organized into modules. The research was conducted using rats. 

New cells develop in the heart but how these cardiac cells are born and how frequently they are generated remains unclear. New research from Brigham and Women's Hospital used a novel method to identify these new heart cells and describe their origins - a Multi-isotope Imaging Mass Spectrometry (MIMS) imaging system that demonstrates cell division in the adult mammalian heart. 

The universe has always had some trace of heavy elements, such as carbon and oxygen, for as far back as astronomers could 'see'. These elements, originally churned from the explosion of massive stars, formed the building blocks for planetary bodies and eventually for life on Earth.

No more, say researchers who  analyzed light from the most distant known quasar, ULAS
J112010641, a galactic nucleus more than 13 billion light-years from Earth, and found matter with no discernible trace of heavy elements. 

Cycling is safer than driving for young British males ages 17 to 20 - driving brings an almost five times greater risk per hour of an accident than cyclists of the same age.