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People Who Smile Are Regarded As Cooler

Imagine one person walks into a room and they are smiling and saying hello to everyone. Then imagine...

Food Waste Is Why Vegetarians Are Harder On The Planet Than Meat Eaters

A new study finds that Americans waste nearly a pound of food per person per day. And at the top...

Asperger Killed Disabled Kids For The Nazis

All of the intellectual elites who joke they have Asperger's or are "on the spectrum" as an excuse...

If Your Doctor Talks About Homeopathy, You Have A Terrible Doctor

Homeopathy, a belief from 200 years ago that if you took something that mimicked the symptoms of...

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There's a mystery in them there clouds - but astronomers at Caltech are on the case.

Near the crowded galactic center, billowing clouds of gas and dust hide a supermassive black hole 3,000,000X as massive as our sun, Its gravity is strong enough to grip stars that are whipping around it at thousands of kilometers per second. One particular cloud named G0.253+0.016
has delighted astronomers. Because scientists love a mystery. 

G0.253+0.016 defies the rules of star formation. But apparently those are more guidelines than rules.

Students everywhere, put down those highlighters and pick up some flashcards! Some of the most popular study strategies, like highlighting and even re-reading, don't show much promise for improving student learning, according to a new paper.

In the article, psychologist John Dunlosky of Kent State University and colleagues review ten learning techniques commonly used by students.

Based on the available evidence, they provide recommendations about the applicability and usefulness of each technique.

People view brown-eyed faces as more trustworthy than those with blue eyes- unless the blue eyes belong to a man with a broad face, according to a new paper in PLOS ONE

Vega is the second brightest star in northern night skies and astronomers using the Infrared Space Telescopes have discovered an asteroid belt much like that of our sun. 

Results showing an asteroid belt around Vega makes it more similar to its twin, the star called Fomalhaut. Both stars now are known to have inner, warm asteroid belts and outer, comet-filled belts, similar in architecture to the asteroid and Kuiper belts in our own solar system.

A popular hypothetical alternative to Albert Einstein's theory for the acceleration of the expansion of the universe does not fit newly obtained data on a fundamental constant, the proton to electron mass ratio, which may mean the need for a new direction in learning about accelerating expansion.

To explain the acceleration of the expansion of the universe, astrophysicists have invoked dark energy – a hypothetical form of energy that permeates all of space. A popular concept of dark energy does not fit new results on the value of the proton mass divided by the electron mass in the early universe. The predicted change in the ratio by the dark energy theory, generally referred to as rolling scalar fields, don't fit the new data.

The Tree of Life is what Charles Darwin first sketched in 1837 to show how species evolved by natural selection. The diagram started at a central point with a common ancestor, then the lines spread apart as organisms evolved and separated into distinct species. The letters represented species.