Plastic: There's Value In Marine Waste

The Biomat research group of the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) is using marine waste...

Biofuels Are A Climate Mistake

Ever since the 1973 oil embargo, U.S. energy policy has sought to replace petroleum-based transportation...

IPhone Lab Detects Cancer, May Lead To Instant Diagnosis

Researchers have developed a low-cost, portable laboratory on an iPhone 5 that can analyze several...

Following Speech In Background Noise - The Problem May Not Be Your Ears

"Could you repeat that?" The reason you may have to say something twice when talking to older family...

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What happens when the modern evolutionary theory of punctuated equilibrium collides with the older theory of mosaic evolution? That's the issue addressed by paleobiologists Melanie J Hopkins at the Museum fuer Naturkunde Berlin and Scott Lidgard at the Field Museum in Chicago.  

The race is on to blame everything related to ecological change on human footprints - even the past can be re-framed as anthropocenic climate change and University of Massachusetts Amherst geoscientists have shown how to do just that, by using a biomarker from human feces in a completely new way to establish the first human presence, the arrival of grazing animals and human population dynamics in a landscape.

Elsevier has launched a new, international, open access journal, Case Studies in Engineering Failure Analysis

The findings of a U.C. San Diego study conclude that marine (saltwater) algae can be just as efficient as freshwater algae in producing biofuels. 

The availability of significant saltwater environments for algae production is obvious. According to a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) report, algal fuels grown in saline water from existing aquifers and recycling nutrients would be able to provide up to twice the goal for advanced biofuels set under the Energy Independence and Security Act - roughly 40 billion gallons or 20 percent of annual transportation fuel demand.  

The wetting model is a classical problem in surface and biomimetic science.  Wettability is determined by the balance between adhesive and cohesive forces, adhesive which is when a liquid tries to spread on a surface and cohesive when it forms into a ball.

The resultant between adhesive and cohesive forces is called the contact angle. As the tendency of a drop to spread out over a surface increases, the contact angle decreases, making the contact angle an inverse measure of wettability.

Various drugs companies have tried to produce antibodies that bind to the type 1 insulin-like growth factor, or IGF-1, receptor on the cell surface, which has a critical part to play in the development of cancer - but have had little success.

Understanding more about how these antibodies work may help explain why only some cancer patients are helped by IGF-1 blockers during clinical tests.