Banner
A New Alternative To Sodium: Fish Sauce

CHICAGO-- Cooks, chefs and food manufacturers are looking for natural ways to reduce sodium in...

Drug Prevents Key Age-related Brain Change In Rats

WASHINGTON, DC -- As brain cells age they lose the fibers that receive neural impulses, a change...

Brain Formation Pattern Shows Why Early Trauma May Leave No Clues

Some of the earliest nerve cells to develop in the womb shape brain circuits that process sights...

Smoking Bans Reduce Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease In Non-Smokers

A Cochrane Library review suggests that smoking bans may reduce harms of passive smoking, unclear...

User picture.
News StaffRSS Feed of this column.

News Releases From All Over The World, Right To You... Read More »

Blogroll
In a study study likely to increase travelers' trust in the TSA, Duke university researchers say identifying a prohibited item such as a water bottle may keep airport security from detecting harder-to-spot items in the same scan.

In the new study, published online in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, researchers asked college students to identify specific targets on a computer display – in this case, two perpendicular lines that form the letter "T" amid distracters, such as Ls and non-Ts. In some cases, Ts were easy to spot, and in other cases more difficult because they blended in with the background.
Moral behavior may increase our capacity for willpower and physical endurance, according to new research from Harvard University.

Participants in the new study who did good deeds -- or even just imagined themselves helping others -- were better able to perform a subsequent task of physical endurance. The research shows a similar or even greater boost in physical strength following dastardly deeds.

Results of the study are published in Social Psychological and Personality Science.
A common treatment for patients with type 2 diabetes could one day help smokers avoid lung cancer, say scientists at the National Cancer Institute.

Metformin decreases levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and circulating insulin, which is important in patients with type 2 diabetes. Early laboratory research presented at the American Association For Cancer Research's annual meeting shows that the drug may also inhibit tumor growth as well.

"This well tolerated, FDA-approved diabetes drug was able to prevent tobacco-carcinogen induced lung tumors," said Phillip A. Dennis, M.D., Ph.D., senior investigator in the medical oncology branch of the National Cancer Institute.
Many Americans go to foreign news sources for coverage of the war in Iraq and Palestinian-Israeli conflict because western media outlets censor gruesome war-time images, according to a study in Media, War and Conflict.

Researchers conducted two online surveys of Al-Jazeera Web users during November and December 2004. They found that most of those who use the Al-Jazeera English-language website are from the U.S., Canada, the U.K and Australia. Respondents indicated that they appreciate the graphic pictures of war they find on the site that they don't see in mainstream media. As one user explained:
Researchers say they have found another potential risk factor for breast cancer--Grandma's diet.

Georgetown University scientists say that pregnant rats that ate a high fat diet not only increased breast cancer risk in their female daughters but also in that daughter's offspring – the "granddaughters." Details of the study will be presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2010.

Why the risk is passed on through two generations is unknown, but experts believe it occurs through as-yet unknown "epigenetic" changes that result in an increase in terminal end buds in the breast tissue – an increase that apparently can then be passed on through generations.
NASA's Terra satellite has captured another image of Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull-Fimmvörduháls volcano ash cloud, now moving into Germany. Eyjafjallajökull continues to spew ash into the air and the ash clouds are still impacting air travel in Northern Europe.

The satellite flew over the volcano on April 16 at 10:45 UTC (6:45 a.m. EDT) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS instrument aboard Terra captured a visible image of Eyjafjallajökull's ash plume over the England and the Netherlands, stretching into Germany.

Air travel into and out of northern Europe has either been grounded or diverted because volcanic ash particles pose a risk of damage to airplane engines.