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Concussion May Impact Men And Women Differently

New research suggests concussion may not significantly impair symptoms or cognitive skills for...

Bees: Activists Remain Silent While This Pollinator Killer Decimates Millions

We know that Greenpeace and other activist groups really,really care about bees. Really....

Coffee Consumption Linked To Lower Risk Of Mild Cognitive Impairment

A new study by researchers at the University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy, Geriatric Unit&...

Estrogen-Suppressing Drugs Substantially Reduce Breast Cancer Deaths

A class of hormonal drugs called aromatase inhibitors substantially reduce the risk of death in...

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"The method we have developed means we can simultaneously detect various kinds of antibiotic residues (macrolides, tetracyclines, quinolones and sulfonamides) in honey", Antonia Garrido, lead author of the study and the researcher in charge of the UAL's Contaminants Analytical Chemistry Research Group, told Servicio de Información y Noticias Científicas (SINC).

In order to develop this method, the results of which have been published recently in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, the researchers employed ultra performance liquid chromatography, a technique that makes it possible to separate the components of a sample, together with mass spectrometry, which permits the simultaneous identification of up to 17 antibiotics.
With the new movie ‘Star Trek’ opening in theaters across the nation, one thing movie goers will undoubtedly see is the Starship Enterprise racing across the galaxy at the speed of light but two Baylor University physicists believe they have an idea that can turn traveling at the speed of light from science fiction to science, and that their idea does not break any laws of physics. 
An international team of geologists may have uncovered the answer to an age-old question - an ice-age-old question, that is. It appears that Earth's earliest ice age may have been due to the rise of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere, which consumed atmospheric greenhouse gases and chilled the earth.

Scientists from the University of Maryland, including post-doctoral fellows Boswell Wing and Sang-Tae Kim, graduate student Margaret Baker, and professors Alan J. Kaufman and James Farquhar, along with colleagues in Germany, South Africa, Canada and the United States, uncovered evidence that the oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere - generally known as the Great Oxygenation Event - coincided with the first widespread ice age on the planet. 
With obesity reaching epidemic numbers, cultural marketing  has long been attempting to tell women that they're beautiful no matter what size they are.   Perception is about to run up against medical health, according to a new study out of Temple University.

In the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology research, Temple researchers studied the body image perceptions of 81 underweight, normal weight, overweight or obese women in the North Philadelphia area and found that as their body mass index (BMI) increased, two-thirds of the women still felt they were at an ideal body size.
Rising shale gas production in the United States and Canada as well as potential natural gas supplies from Iraq could be pivotal in curbing Russia's ability to organize an "energy weapon" against European consumers, according to a new study released today by Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy. 

The study, "Russia and the Caspian Basin in the World Energy Balance," examines Russia's evolving energy relations with its Caspian neighbors, the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and the West and considers potential scenarios for Russian and Caspian oil and natural gas strategies.
Methane has 23X the warming impact of carbon dioxide and food production, including livestock, is a huge source of methane, spiking as larger world populations have led to increased production.  

University of Alberta researchers say they have developed a formula to reduce methane gas (basically, farts) in cattle, balancing starch, sugar, cellulose, ash, fat and other elements of feed.  They say this will give beef producers the tools to lessen the methane gas their cattle produce by as much as 25 per cent.