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We're Too Late To Prevent 137,000 More Ebola Cases, Says Epidemiology Paper

The Ebola virus problem in West Africa has gotten lots of high-profile media coverage in developed...

The Army May Not Increase Risk Of Suicide, More Suicidal People May Join

Due to increased awareness of suicide and military life, there has been concern military lifestyle...

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Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have devised the first computerized method that can analyze a single photograph and determine where in the world the image likely was taken. It's a feat made possible by searching through millions of GPS-tagged images in the Flickr online photo collection.

The IM2GPS algorithm developed by computer science graduate student James Hays and Alexei A. Efros, assistant professor of computer science and robotics, doesn't attempt to scan a photo for location clues, such as types of clothing, the language on street signs, or specific types of vegetation, as a person might do. Rather, it analyzes the composition of the photo, notes how textures and colors are distributed and records the number and orientation of lines in the photo.

Two stars, each with the same mass and in orbit around each other, are twins that one would expect to be identical. So astronomers were surprised when they discovered that twin stars in the Orion Nebula, a well-known stellar nursery 1,500 light years away, were not identical at all. In fact, these stars exhibited significant differences in brightness, surface temperature and possibly even size.

The study published in the June 19 Nature suggests that one of the stars formed significantly earlier than its twin. Because astrophysicists have assumed that binary stars form simultaneously, the discovery provides an important new challenge for today's star formation theories, forcing theorists to reexamine their models to see if the models can indeed produce binaries with stars that form at different times.


The pageantry of Oprah Winfrey’s talk show, the Coca-Cola empire, Michael Jackson’s turn from the King of Pop into an iconic global recluse: American pop culture – Hollywood cinema, television, pop music – dominates the rest of the world through its hegemonic presence. Does that make everyone a hybridized American, or do these elements find mediation within the other cultures that consume them?

Fabricating the Absolute Fake. America in Contemporary Pop Culture by Jaap Kooijman applies concepts of postmodern theory – Baudrillard’s hyperreality and Eco’s “absolute fake,” among others – to this globally mediated American pop culture in order to examine both the phenomenon itself and its appropriation in the Netherlands, as evidenced by such diverse cultural icons as the Elvis-inspired crooner Lee Towers, the Moroccan-Dutch rapper Ali B, musical tributes to an assassinated politician, and the Dutch reality soap opera scene.


Bacteria survive everywhere. Under the sea, in the air, even in some of the hottest environments on Earth.

How are microbes seemingly so smart? Bacteria don't just react to changes in their surroundings, say Princeton University researchers, they anticipate and prepare for them. The findings, reported in the June 6 issue of Science, challenge the prevailing notion that only organisms with complex nervous systems have this ability.

"What we have found is the first evidence that bacteria can use sensed cues from their environment to infer future events," says Saeed Tavazoie, an associate professor in the department of Molecular Biology, who conducted the study along with graduate student Ilias Tagkopoulos and post-doctoral researcher Yir-Chung Liu.

It's an ingredient found in dandruff shampoos and, if you're a movie buff, you also know it was used to help fight off alien invaders in the film "Evolution."

Scientists at the University of Leicester are now using selenium as a tool in investigating how the oxygen content of the oceans has changed over geologically recent time.

Selenium is an anti-oxidant and an essential trace nutrient in our diet. It belongs to a group of elements whose behavior is controlled by the concentration of oxygen in the environment. Now scientists are using selenium as part of a research project to measure the isotopic ratios of selenium in sediments.

Between 54 percent and 64 percent of hospitals had chaplaincy services between 1980 and 2003, despite changes over the last fifteen years in national accreditation guidelines making the religious and spiritual care of hospitalized patients a right.

This protection seems to have had no effect on the number of hospitals with chaplains and there was no systematic trend over this period.

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