There are 10^11 stars in the galaxy. That used to be a huge number. But it's only a hundred billion. It's less than the national deficit! We used to call them astronomical numbers. Now we should call them economical numbers.

Richard Feynman, who would turn 97 years old today. Happy birthday, mr. Feynman!

All light is made of electromagnetic waves.  This means that like any wave, there is something repeatedly sloshing back and forth with light.  A water wave is crests and troughs on the water going up and down over and over as they travel across the surface.  Light waves have some resemblance in that with light, it is electric and magnetic fields which are periodically wobbling back and forth. 

I like to use the Sneetches With Stars analogy (I did so again two days ago) because Theodor Seuss Geisel, famously known as Dr. Seuss, was spot on with the idea that humans would find a reason to be different from one another. In the Sneetch community, when one group had a star, they were superior, and eventually a savvy businessman came along and found a way to give everyone stars (which was delightfully both capitalism and communism, kind of like Science 2.0 is) and then, as predicted, when everyone now had a star the group who originally had stars but had claimed it was just nature that they were superior, bought star removal for themselves.



Italy, one of the key players of the European Space Agency (ESA), is continuously building up its important role in human spaceflight and in international space cooperation.
Sometimes I write stuff here not because I know things, but rather, because I would like to know more, and I think the audience of this blog may help me find the material I need to become more knowledgeable on some topic. Having a blog is a privilege, in the sense that the one-to-many communication it establishes between the writer and the readers allows the owner to sometimes have access to the (all together vast) knowledge of his or her readers. Thanks to you, dear reader, to your comments, reactions, and suggestions expressed in the comments thread, I learn more on topics I do not have an expertise on. I cherish this one-to-many communcation means and I am grateful to you for it. 

Many overlapping road maps to life extension are opening up.

Fish and flowers inspire diving goggle material


says an article in Chemistry World

First, the fish.  Fish repel oil by trapping water within their scales to create a self-cleaning, oil-repellent coat.

And in the other corner, this little flower, Diphylleia grayi, – also known as the skeleton flower – which has the property that when rained on, its petals turn transparent, becoming white again on drying out.

Detecting ionizing radiation does not mean that a disaster has or will occur.  Detecting radiation is generally a good thing if the radiation is expected, intended or natural.  We and all living things on earth are naturally radioactive.  This is due primarily to our requirement to have a healthy level of potassium and carbon in our bodies (and these are both naturally radioactive). 

Periodically I get invited to talk about science and food on the nationwide AgriTalk radio program, hosted by Mike Adams - not the Natural News guy,  this is the one who likes farmers.

Joining me today was Roxi Beck of the Center for Food Integrity. You're all used to me so what I say may not be anything new, but Beck made terrific points, namely that even as people are supportive of technology in their phones, they may not want it in their bodies - even with modern medicine adding 30 years to human life expectancy in the last century. 
"B.W. Lee also carries much of the responsibility for calling the Higgs boson the Higgs boson, mentioning repeatedly 'Higgs scalar fields' in a review talk at the International Conference on High-Energy Physics in 1972."
J. Ellis, M.K. Gaillard, D. Nanopoulos, "An updated historical profile of the Higgs boson", arxiv:1504.07217.