The Ancient Greeks (Archimedes being an honourable exception) have a reputation for having been only interested in pure studies, and despising practical applications (which may well have helped the Romans take over.)

I recently came across an interesting article syndicated through the DC-based "Tribune News Service" by Evan Halper, formerly an LATimes correspondent. Entitled "Nuclear pitched as the new green," it immediately caught my attention for a variety of reasons:

In this blog, I challenge the vaulted role that tensor calculus enjoys today. I will define a concrete example of what I consider to be a technical flaw in the tools of tensor calculus in all modern physics theories. The complaint is about completeness, that partial stories are not good enough. Please feel free to defend the status quo in the comments.


The relativistic quantum field equation for a spin 0 particle is the Klein-Gordon equation (written in natural units):




One takes the first derivative of the wave function. Also take three spatial derivatives. Then take the second time derivative of the wave function, and similarly for the three spatial derivatives.
Interna

Interna

Dec 10 2015 | 1 comment(s)

As I am sure happens with many other human occupations, the job of a particle physicist proceeds in bursts of activity interspersed with periods of more relative calm. Deadlines must be met, and sometimes several of them overlap. The life of a physicist can get miserable for short periods of time, but after those end one usually looks back with satisfaction at the accomplishments.
As the son of a cruise ship captain, Dr. Amir Aczel spent his early life traveling, and that experienced informed how he spent all of his 65 years intellectually.

A day or two ago, local ITV featured a news item about a man who had kept the same plastic bulk issue shopping carrier bag for 34 years, using it from time to time.

The bag celebrated 50 years since the first Tesco store was opened in 1929, and he had acquired this one in 1981, the year of the first London Marathon.


Why would you want to create a group of farmers who would not need state milk producer licenses, permits, or to obey state milk quality rules while selling something that everyone not making a buck hustling it or being duped by faux health claims into buying it knows is dangerous?

When the NYTimes' columnist, Nicholas Kristof, writes based upon his experiences and observations among the impoverished and exploited women and children of the third world, he is resonant and inspirational.

In the mood for some science on Thanksgiving? 

Me too, science is the one thing that has not been steamrolled by Christmas. Instead, Thanksgiving is arguably the most scientific holiday, because it involves agriculture, chemistry and physics.

If you are worried about chemicals, for example, there is good news on Thanksgiving: You can buy a 100 percent organic, shade-grown, no-GMO meal AND IT WILL BE 100 PERCENT STUFFED with cancer-causing carcinogens.
Today, the NYT reported that Coca-Cola's Chief Scientist is stepping down in the midst of a controversy regarding Coke's support of researchers who emphasize exercise for weight control. Dr.