Interna

Interna

Dec 10 2015 | 1 comment(s)

As I am sure happens with many other human occupations, the job of a particle physicist proceeds in bursts of activity interspersed with periods of more relative calm. Deadlines must be met, and sometimes several of them overlap. The life of a physicist can get miserable for short periods of time, but after those end one usually looks back with satisfaction at the accomplishments.
As the son of a cruise ship captain, Dr. Amir Aczel spent his early life traveling, and that experienced informed how he spent all of his 65 years intellectually.

A day or two ago, local ITV featured a news item about a man who had kept the same plastic bulk issue shopping carrier bag for 34 years, using it from time to time.

The bag celebrated 50 years since the first Tesco store was opened in 1929, and he had acquired this one in 1981, the year of the first London Marathon.


Why would you want to create a group of farmers who would not need state milk producer licenses, permits, or to obey state milk quality rules while selling something that everyone not making a buck hustling it or being duped by faux health claims into buying it knows is dangerous?

When the NYTimes' columnist, Nicholas Kristof, writes based upon his experiences and observations among the impoverished and exploited women and children of the third world, he is resonant and inspirational.

In the mood for some science on Thanksgiving? 

Me too, science is the one thing that has not been steamrolled by Christmas. Instead, Thanksgiving is arguably the most scientific holiday, because it involves agriculture, chemistry and physics.

If you are worried about chemicals, for example, there is good news on Thanksgiving: You can buy a 100 percent organic, shade-grown, no-GMO meal AND IT WILL BE 100 PERCENT STUFFED with cancer-causing carcinogens.
Today, the NYT reported that Coca-Cola's Chief Scientist is stepping down in the midst of a controversy regarding Coke's support of researchers who emphasize exercise for weight control. Dr.
Well, don't this beat all! An article in The Guardian announcing the 17 newly-honored Presidential Medal of Freedom awardees was entitled, "First EPA chief accuses Republicans of ignoring science for political gain."
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100 Years of Einstein’s General Relativity

In 2012, the enthusiasm for poll averaging reached a fever pitch. Very few people were critical of it and instead talked about how science had taken over predictive politics. (1)

I was critical of the accuracy and swam against the tide of those in media gushing about the new frontier opened up by New York Times statistical pundit Nate Silver and others, which posited that we could now predict outcomes with unprecedented accuracy. 'They don't do any polls,' I noted, 'So we are supposed to believe there is some miracle of weighting they do in polls done by someone else.' It's the same flaw we find in epidemiology when a scholar does an unweighted random effects meta-analysis to conclude organic strawberries taste better or whatever.