SETI has listened to KIC 8462852 for two kinds of signals and found nothing stronger than an intensity of 100 Jy (Jansky). They looked for purposefully broadcast narrow band signals and a wide band omnidirectional signal not purposefully sent.  Their first observational pass lasting two weeks found , in their words, "To summarize these observations, we estimate an upper limit for anomalous flux from KIC 8462852 to be 100 Jy in a 100 kHz band over the frequencies displayed." 1  Put another way either no one is transmitting, or no one there is transmitting anything strong enough for us to detect at the distance KIC8462852 is from us (about 1500 light years).  
The WF-Collapse (WF-C) is in general a nonlocal phenomenon.

In my last blog, I wrote in detail about zero, one, real numbers, complex numbers and quaternions (or as I now prefer to call them, space-time numbers although I use them interchangeably). For each sort of number, there were rules for addition, rules for multiplication, and a relevant animation. The rules happened to get more complicated going from zero out to the space-time numbers, but they were all of the same form. That makes sense since zero, one, the real numbers, and the complex numbers live inside the tent of space-time numbers.

Is there a battle between astrology and science?

The law of gravity is readily recognized and easily tested.  The force that gave rise to the expression, "whatever goes up must come down" has indeed undergone extensive scientific testing and is largely considered to be one of the most fundamental forces in all of nature.  The very pull of it can be felt as you read these words as you are held to your chair or the floor rather than floating around like a helium balloon.  Given this, is it possible for the gravitational forces from the planets to give rise to meaningful predictions from astrology?

It's Halloween and I am in New York and I wanted to do something local. But since Sleepy Hollow does not have a way to get there by subway (I don't even know where I would rent a car in Manhattan, I suppose I could get there by bus, but even using a subway is a populist stretch for me) I instead decided to get up and create a Ghostbusters tour.  Why? Because even though only three actual weeks of filming took place here, it is strongly associated with the city.

Fortunately I am just a few blocks from Spook Central where all of the real action takes place, and almost all of it was on a subway line, minus some technology hiccups.(1)

Last week, the American Cancer Society changed its recommendations for normal-risk women regarding screening mammograms: they took a middle road between their prior advisories and those of the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF): ACS no longer recommends routine mammograms for women age 40-44, and advised reducing frequency to every two years for women aged 55 and older.

In 2014, one person confirmed with Ebola set off a panic in the United States. Though 28,000 people died of heart disease while media attention focused on that outbreak, and anti-vaccine parents on the West Coast were suddenly prepared to spend any amount of money to get their kids immunized against it, what happened with pandemic preparation after the fear subsided was...not much.

The fact is, we tend not to think about disaster preparedness unless disaster is already upon us. This makes some sense, of course, because people may be hungry right now so there isn't much point to spending money worrying about a volcano - but pandemics are so devastating and so rapid in their effects that it almost demands there be some level of preparedness.
A storm has been brewing, over why in Britain women are more opposed to fracking than men.  Whether it is simply a storm in a teacup, or a mighty tornado, time will tell.  Here are three articles in succession, two from the Telegraph:

Women ‘don’t understand’ fracking, leading scientist claims

Averil Macdonald, chairwoman of UK Onshore Oil and Gas, says women lack scientific understanding so follow their ‘gut instinct’.
  Nonlocality is an inherent natural feature of quantum reality described by its wave function (WF). It shows itself up not only in the widely discussed cases with two or more particles, but also with one spinless particle. The point is that the WF-Collapse (WF-C) is in general a nonlocal phenomenon. Consider for example a one particle plane wave in quantum mechanics: the particle location in one place is a WF-C that replaces the plane wave by a new WF with zero location in all other places. It means simultaneous prediction with confidence of negative search results at any other remote place where the particle could have been detected before the WF-collapse. It is not spooky; it is strange, but natural.   
If you are in Manhattan or one of the five boroughs or New Jersey or Long Island and want a free beer and to talk about science communication, you are invited to join me as guest of honor at the Science On Tap event, October 28th from 6:30-9:30 PM. 

The location is Connolly's Pub&Restaurant at 121 West 45th Street.