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I am Sorry Retractions and First Ever Book Recommendation

I am truly sorry about certain things that I wrote. For example, I have previously written about...

A Flexible Evolving Approach To Computing

We already must deal with computers too much rather than too little, and there is already lots...

Out Of Africa: What They Do Not Tell Us

The (Pre-)Neanderthals were the first, you see:...

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Sascha VongehrRSS Feed of this column.

Dr. Sascha Vongehr [风洒沙], physicist and philosopher, studied phil/math/chem/phys in Germany, obtained a BSc in theoretical physics (electro-mag) & MSc (stringtheory) at Sussex University... Read More »

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The very small is very weird; I explained that the last time in Small Is Ugly 1 already with help of the example of water being in the driest of places (Vastness and Fastness of the Small helps Evolution is of course somewhat related). And today, I still do not mean supposed "quantum weirdness", which is not about small stuff.

How is this for some exciting news, straight from the same source as “I Let My Computer Use My Brain” three years ago, but much advanced in the ways artificial intelligence (AI) has integrated itself further so that most anybody can now work with it, or better, play with it and do cutting edge research nevertheless (UPDATE: this is now also featured on the Wolfram website):

     Today is my 43rd birthday. When I was 34 years old, I walked along a narrow river through the city of Nanning in the south of China. I was lonely and depressed, no matter the PhD degree I had recently obtained, my freedom, the beauty all around, the women I could easily befriend wherever.

I came to the conclusion that my life is not worth its suffering, and that it must either change, that I must change, or it is idiotic to go on living. I asked myself:

    Many high IQ Asperger sufferers think that their rationality is ultimately superior. Their moralizing provides judgments; their “honesty” blurts them out. Such behavior is usually felt to be inappropriate. Rationalizing such as a somehow more upstanding, righteous way is in many cases quite silly especially from a rational perspective. Their often narrowly focused moralizing does precisely not submit tacitly held values to rational analysis.

 

Pathological thought can be helpful, especially the Asperger’s variety. Ludwig Wittgenstein became the arguably greatest philosopher, overseeing the postmodern. The mathematician Paul Erdös is another good example.

 

In time for Autistic Pride Day 18 June:

    Why do people congratulate somebody? Asperger’s sufferers often do not understand this. I asked myself:

  I’ve won the lottery, so why additionally congratulate me? If congratulation is something positive, why give it to someone who has just been lucky already?