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    Urban Gardeners Could Be Doing More Health Harm Than Good
    By News Staff | March 31st 2014 02:58 PM | 2 comments | Print | E-mail | Track Comments

    Consuming foods grown in urban gardens has become a big fad, and those foods might even offer health benefits, unless a lack of knowledge about the soil used for planting poses a health threat to both consumers and gardeners. 

    A new paper the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future (CLF), researchers identifies a range of factors and challenges related to the perceived risk of soil contamination among urban community gardeners and found a need for clear and concise information on how best to prevent and manage soil contamination. 

    According to CLF researchers, urban soils are often close to pollution sources, such as industrial areas and heavily trafficked roads and as a result, many soil contaminants have been found at higher concentrations in urban centers.

    To characterize urban community gardeners' knowledge and perceptions of soil contamination risks and reducing exposure, researchers conducted surveys among urban community gardeners and semi-structured interviews with key informants in the gardening community in Baltimore, Md. Informants included individuals whose job function or organizational affiliation makes them knowledgeable about Baltimore City community gardening and soil contamination.



    "Our study suggests gardeners generally recognize the importance of knowing a garden site's prior uses, but they may lack the information and expertise to determine accurately the prior use of their garden site and potential contaminants in the soil. They may also have misperceptions or gaps in knowledge, about how best to minimize their risk of exposure to contaminants that may be in urban soil," said Keeve Nachman, PhD, senior author of the study and director of the Food Production and Public Health Program with CLF.  

    "People may come into contact with these contaminants if they work or play in contaminated soil, or eat food that was grown in it. In some cases, exposure to soil contaminants can increase disease risks, especially for young children," said Brent Kim, MHS, lead author of the paper and a program officer with CLF. "Given the health, social, environmental and economic benefits associated with participating in and supporting urban green spaces, it is critical to protect the viability of urban community gardens while also ensuring a safe gardening environment."



    Citation: Kim BF, Poulsen MN, Margulies JD, Dix KL, Palmer AM, et al. (2014) Urban Community Gardeners' Knowledge and Perceptions of Soil Contaminant Risks. PLoS ONE 9(2): e87913. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0087913.


    Comments

    OMG, this article is so not politically correct! Don't you know that is practically heresy to say anything against urban gardens even if the facts speak otherwise?

    Not to split hairs here, but the article should have made the distinction between vegetable gardens and other types such as flower gardens.

    Hank
    Science is inherently heretical. It is only recently that science became a tool for social engineering and political causes. Science 2.0 is taking it back for awkward questions of popular fads and understanding natural laws and everything else that goes into reason and evidence.